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So can anyone give ideas on how to update a set of rows?

I understand the concept of query -> new table, then dumping the "old" table and re-naming the "new", but to be honest this is very hokey.

I don't see anything in the documentation, web, or in the new ideas that will lead me to believe in the appearance of an "update" statement either.

Thoughts anyone?

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2 Answers 2

BigQuery does not currently support direct updates to individual rows. You can append to a table, and you can truncate/overwrite a table, but you cannot apply an update to a single row while leaving the rest of the table untouched.

The flow you mentioned (create new table, replace old table) is a reasonable approach. If it helps, note that you do not need two separate steps to replace the old table with the new table. Since BigQuery applies job side-effects atomically, you can replace the old table in one step by setting the writeDisposition on the final copy job to WRITE_TRUNCATE. For example, you could do the following steps:

  query table -> temp_table
  copy temp_table -> table with WRITE_TRUNCATE

You could even consider doing this in one step by explicitly setting the destination table on your query job:

  query table -> table with WRITE_TRUNCATE

The downside to this second approach is that you lose the old version of the table in the process, so if you make a mistake writing your query, you can't get the old data back. With two steps, you have a chance to validate the new table before overwriting the original table.

In either case, while this update process is occurring, you can have query jobs running against "table", and those jobs are guaranteed to see either the old content or the new content, with no inconsistent or erroneous states in between.

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"In either case, while this update process is occurring, you can have query jobs running against "table", and those jobs are guaranteed to see either the old content or the new content, with no inconsistent or erroneous states in between." Really? That makes absolutely not sense at all. –  user2788456 Sep 18 '13 at 18:49

"In either case, while this update process is occurring, you can have query jobs running against "table", and those jobs are guaranteed to see either the old content or the new content, with no inconsistent or erroneous states in between."

Really? That makes absolutely not sense at all.

How do you know which dataset you are receiving information from? (the updated one or the "old" one)

Seems like users could get very inconsisent (read here duplicate) rows and aggregations from this data set while the update is occurring.

Also seems to me that the direction of this product is being taken from young, inexperienced people whose one and only career client has been Google.

I've been doing this for 20 years and this one shortcoming makes this an invalid solution for every client I've ever had.

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By the way, I'm being critical because I see HUGE potential in Google Bigquery. I would love to use it for my clients, but just cannot justify it right now. –  user2788456 Sep 18 '13 at 20:19
    
What is the shortcoming? It sounded like you misunderstood the response above. Queries will always see a consistent view. That is, if you are running a truncate operation on the table, at the same time you are querying the table, you will see a consistent view -- you'll never see an empty table, you'll never see partial data, you'll only see the original table or the table with the update applied. –  Jordan Tigani Sep 18 '13 at 20:36
    
Moreover, if you do care about the exact version of the table you're querying against, you can use the table@time syntax, which was launched this morning. You can query against a snapshot of the table at any time within the last 24 hours, and you're guaranteed to see the table exactly as it existed at that time, even if the table has since been updated. –  Jordan Tigani Sep 18 '13 at 20:38

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