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Today in my interview one interviewer asked me to write a Singleton class. And i gave my answer as

public class Singleton {

    private static Singleton ref;

    private Singleton() {
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        if (ref == null) {
            ref = new Singleton();
        }
        return ref;
    }
}

suddenly he told me this is old way of writing the class. Can any one please help me why he told like that.

share|improve this question
10  
Well it's not thread-safe, for one thing. You'd be better off using a static initializer - and consider using an enum with one value, which have various other benefits such as being serializable. –  Jon Skeet Sep 17 '13 at 16:46
2  
Before your next interview, you should read through "Effective Java". Chances are that your interviewer has its knowledge from the same book :-) –  Gyro Gearless Sep 17 '13 at 17:24
1  
For interviews, I'd also read up on Spring Framework as that does a lot of singleton handling and is used a lot in server side work. –  matt helliwell Nov 13 '13 at 16:00

11 Answers 11

up vote 35 down vote accepted
+150

The first thing which comes to my mind when creating a singleton is enum. I generally use enum to implement singleton:

enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;
}

One benefit you get with using enum is with Serialization.

With singleton class, you would have to make sure that serialization and deserialization doesn't create a new instance by implementing the readResolve() method, while this is not the case with enum.

Using class you should create the singleton like this:

public final class Singleton implements Serializable {
    // For lazy-laoding (if only you want)
    private static class SingletonHolder {
        private static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();
    }

    private Singleton() {
        if (SingletonHolder.INSTANCE != null) {
            // throw Some Exception
        }
    }

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return SingletonHolder.INSTANCE;
    }

    // To avoid deserialization create new instance
    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    private Singleton readResolve() {
        return SingletonHolder.INSTANCE;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@user2775766 You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Sep 17 '13 at 17:00
    
than you alot sir –  Som Sep 17 '13 at 17:10
    
sir he asked singleton class should be final or not.what can i give answer for that –  Som Sep 17 '13 at 17:10
2  
@user2775766. It's not hard and fast rule, but I would suggest to make it final, and try to avoid inheriting a singleton. –  Rohit Jain Sep 17 '13 at 17:17
6  
Because of the private constructor, the singleton class may not be subclassed, anyway. But declaring it as "final" makes it more obvious to the unwary programmer :-) –  Gyro Gearless Sep 17 '13 at 17:33

Latest Standard Solutions:

  • Core java with Managed Beans / CDI

    @ApplicationScoped
    public class MySingleton { ... }
    
  • EJB Lite (JEE6)

    @Singleton
    public class MySingleton { ... }
    

Prior Recommendation (from 'Effective Java 2'):

  • Use an enum, with a single bogus enumeration constant e.g. INSTANCE. Data fields and methods can be either static or non-static (instance) - the two behave equivalently, since there's only one instance

  • Advantages:

    • Yep, it's a singleton. Impossible to create more than one instance by any mechanism (within any given class loader on any JVM).
    • Singleton initialization is thread safe.
  • Disadvantages (compared with above Standard Solutions):

    • The definition is a little obtuse - the 'enum' outer shell could misdirect inexperienced code maintainers. It's a small hack, not the original intention of enum.
    • The implementation leaks through the abstraction. It violates the Uniform Access Principle
      • It doesn't work via injection - the client must know it is a singleton & code against the precise enum instance
      • The client must use Singleton.INSTANCE.someMethod()
      • The client can't (simply) code against an interface
      • The client's impacted by design changes between singleton to/from multi-instance objects
    • Extends an ancestor class (Enum), preventing inheritance from other classes
    • Serialization & deserialization just transfer the enum constant name without state - good for technically ensuring there's only one instance, but a null operation with regards to data. In the (rare) event one wanted to share/synchronise singleton state across JVMs/class loaders, replication via serialization couldn't be used.
share|improve this answer

You can do

public enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;
}

and for a utility class which has no instances

public enum Utility {
     ;

     public static void method();
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you alot sir... –  Som Sep 17 '13 at 16:57
    
sir he asked singleton class should be final or not.what can i give answer for that –  Som Sep 17 '13 at 17:10
2  
enum with no instances - wouldn't have thought about that. Nice :-) –  Gyro Gearless Sep 17 '13 at 17:21
    
@sourabh an enum is final. Singletons should be final ideally as there should only be one instance for which you shouldn't need more than one class. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 17 '13 at 22:04
    
Why using an enum instead of just a static class? –  Maxime Nov 12 '13 at 19:30

As others have already pointed out, the enum pattern is now widely considered a better approach to the Singleton vs. the old-school method, but I just wanted to point out a drawback.

We had a Singleton in the form of:

public enum Foo {
    INSTANCE;
}

that had been around for awhile, working just fine. Then during a code review, we saw this:

public enum Foo {
    INSTANCE,
    ANOTHER;
}

After we smacked him across the face with a wet mackerel, the coder in question had seen the error of his ways, and a larger than small amount of code had to be backed out and/or rewritten. Yes, we caught it before it went out into production, but work had to be done to erase it.

I feel that this a weakness of this type of Singleton (albeit small and perhaps rare) vs. the old-school way. Yes, you can break any pattern by implementing it wrong, but it seems a whole heck of a lot easier for a coder to break an enum Singelton than a well-formed old-school Singleton.

EDIT:

For completeness, here's an enum Singleton that guards against additional values getting added later:

public enum Foo
{
  INSTANCE;
  // adding another type here will cause a runtime

  static
  {
    if (Foo.values().length != 1)
    {
      throw new IllegalStateException("Not a Singleton.");
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

He's probably look for this answer:

public class Singleton 
{
   private static Singleton ref;
   static
   {
       ref = new Singleton();
   }
   private Singleton()
   {
   }
   public static Singleton getInstance() 
   {
       return ref;
   }
}

Notice the static block. This approach is probably heavy since the instance is created upon class loading.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you alot sir... –  Som Sep 17 '13 at 16:58
    
If this resolves your issue, the please feel free to accept it as the answer. But it's entirely upto you..... –  Anup Saumithri Sep 17 '13 at 17:01
    
sir he asked singleton class should be final or not.what can i give answer for that –  Som Sep 17 '13 at 17:09
    
You could replace the static block by a static field initializer expression (or however it's called). –  maaartinus Nov 18 '13 at 11:07

The Singleton I'd write would look like this:

@Service
class PersonService {
    // implementation here
}

But I also like the enum ideas. In reality, I never write (nor need) a Singleton other than one like the one above.

share|improve this answer
    
Surely this assumes some third-party framework (Spring?)? –  Boris the Spider Sep 17 '13 at 16:53
    
Correct. But it's still what I would use in practice, most of the time. Of course, depending on how Spring is configured, this doesn't have to be a Singleton, it can also be a prototype (a new instance). –  Erik Pragt Sep 18 '13 at 7:10

Why can't you do just

public class SingletonSandBox {

    private static SingletonSandBox instance = new SingletonSandBox();

    private SingletonSandBox(){
    }

    public static SingletonSandBox getInstance(){
        return instance;
    }

}

and test

public static void main(String[] args) {

        SingletonSandBox sss1 = SingletonSandBox.getInstance();

        SingletonSandBox sss2 = SingletonSandBox.getInstance();

        System.out.println(sss1 == sss2);

}

As I know this is thread-safe and shorter than using static block. Again static field declaration is read earlier comparing to static block by the runtime.

share|improve this answer

This is because your solution is not threadsafe.

The modern way is to tie the instance to an enum value:

enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;
}

If you want to use lazy init of the instance then you can use the ClassLoader to guarantee thread safety:

public class Singleton {
        private Singleton() { }

        private static class SingletonHolder { 
                public static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();
        }

        public static Singleton getInstance() {
                return SingletonHolder.INSTANCE;
        }
}

More information on Wikipedia

share|improve this answer
    
thank you alot sir. –  Som Sep 17 '13 at 17:12

From What is an efficient way to implement a singleton pattern in Java?

Use an enum:

 public enum Foo 
 {
   INSTANCE;
 }

Joshua Bloch explained this approach in his book 'Effective Java'

Also check out The better Java singleton pattern nowadays?

share|improve this answer
    
thank you alot sir. –  Som Sep 17 '13 at 17:14

A thread safe version of the OPs initial approach, plus no one else dared to suggest a synchronized statement.

final class Singleton
{
    private static Object lock = new Object();
    private static volatile Singleton instance = null;
    private Singleton() { }
    public static Singleton getInstance()
    {
        if(instance == null)
        {
            synchronized(lock)
            {
                if(instance == null)
                {
                    instance = new Singleton();
                }
            }
        }
        return instance;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for unsynchronized check & lazy init (one could perhaps use the class itself as a lock object?) –  Sam Nov 19 '13 at 18:57
    
@sam - something like synchronized(Singleton.class) {...}, I think the explicit lock object gives a semblance of readability, but using the .class literal won't hurt. –  LastCoder Nov 19 '13 at 19:30

It could be because it does not use "double-checked-locking" (as others have said) or it could also be because it is apparently possible to invoke a private constructor using reflection (if the security policy allows it).

To invoke a constructor with no parameters pass an empty array.

package org.example;

public class Singleton {

    private static final Object LOCK = new Object();
    private static final Singleton SINGLETON = new Singleton();
    private static volatile boolean init = false; // 'volatile' to prevent threads from caching state locally (prevent optimizing) 

    private Singleton() {
        synchronized (LOCK) {
            if( init == true) {
                throw new RuntimeException("This is a singleton class!");
            }
            init=true;
        }
    }

    public static Singleton obtainClassInstance() {
        return SINGLETON;
    }

}


package org.example;

import java.lang.reflect.Constructor;
import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;

public class SimpleSingletonTester {

    /**
     * @param args
     * @throws NoSuchMethodException 
     * @throws SecurityException 
     * @throws InvocationTargetException 
     * @throws IllegalAccessException 
     * @throws InstantiationException 
     * @throws IllegalArgumentException 
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws SecurityException, NoSuchMethodException, 
    IllegalArgumentException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException 
    {

        Class[] parameterTypes = {};
        Object[] initargs = {};
        Constructor<Singleton> constructor = Singleton.class.getDeclaredConstructor(parameterTypes);
        System.out.println( constructor.isAccessible() );
        constructor.setAccessible(true);
        System.out.println( constructor.isAccessible() );
        System.out.println( constructor.newInstance(initargs) );
        System.out.println( constructor.newInstance(initargs) );

    }

}
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