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What's the simplest, library-free code for implementing array intersections in javascript? I want to write

intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5])

and get

[2, 3]
share|improve this question
8  
Do you want simple or fast? – SLaks Dec 11 '09 at 3:07
5  
Priority is simple, but it can't be so brain-dead that it will be a performance hog :) – Peter Dec 11 '09 at 3:08
9  
In case you miss it : the simplest answer is not the accepted one but the one in the bottom : stackoverflow.com/questions/1885557/… – redben Aug 17 '14 at 14:42

22 Answers 22

up vote 106 down vote accepted

Destructive seems simplest, especially if we can assume the input is sorted:

/* destructively finds the intersection of 
 * two arrays in a simple fashion.  
 *
 * PARAMS
 *  a - first array, must already be sorted
 *  b - second array, must already be sorted
 *
 * NOTES
 *  State of input arrays is undefined when
 *  the function returns.  They should be 
 *  (prolly) be dumped.
 *
 *  Should have O(n) operations, where n is 
 *    n = MIN(a.length, b.length)
 */
function intersection_destructive(a, b)
{
  var result = [];
  while( a.length > 0 && b.length > 0 )
  {  
     if      (a[0] < b[0] ){ a.shift(); }
     else if (a[0] > b[0] ){ b.shift(); }
     else /* they're equal */
     {
       result.push(a.shift());
       b.shift();
     }
  }

  return result;
}

Non-destructive has to be a hair more complicated, since we’ve got to track indices:

/* finds the intersection of 
 * two arrays in a simple fashion.  
 *
 * PARAMS
 *  a - first array, must already be sorted
 *  b - second array, must already be sorted
 *
 * NOTES
 *
 *  Should have O(n) operations, where n is 
 *    n = MIN(a.length(), b.length())
 */
function intersect_safe(a, b)
{
  var ai=0, bi=0;
  var result = [];

  while( ai < a.length && bi < b.length )
  {
     if      (a[ai] < b[bi] ){ ai++; }
     else if (a[ai] > b[bi] ){ bi++; }
     else /* they're equal */
     {
       result.push(a[ai]);
       ai++;
       bi++;
     }
  }

  return result;
}
share|improve this answer
6  
There's numerous errors in intersect_safe: length is a property in Arrays, not a method. There's an undelared variable i in result.push(a[i]);. Finally, this simply doesn't work in the general case: two objects where neither is greater than the other according to the > operator are not necessarily equal. intersect_safe( [ {} ], [ {} ] ), for example, will give (once the previously mentioned errors are fixed) an array with one element, which is clearly wrong. – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 11:00
3  
You can also use .slice(0) to create a clone of the array in intersect_safe, rather than tracking indexes. – johnluetke Sep 10 '11 at 23:42
4  
@Asad: Look at the dates. My answer was 2009. The one you linked was in 2011. – atk Nov 30 '12 at 18:18
4  
@Asad please be more careful with your not-so-subtle accusations of plagarism in the future. It is very insulting to be falsely accused. Especially when the original author – atk Dec 1 '12 at 2:57
2  
@Asad: Apology accepted. And I fully agree with your underlying position :) – atk Dec 2 '12 at 18:37

Use a combination of filter and indexOf.

array1.filter(function(n) {
    return array2.indexOf(n) != -1;
});
share|improve this answer
11  
In the worst case, there is no intersection. array2.indexof(n) will have to check every element of array2 for each element of array1. Complexity should be O(n*m). On larger arrays, this will become very slow. – atk Dec 11 '09 at 3:47
3  
filter and indexOf are not supported in some browsers, notably IE. – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 10:46
6  
Which you can solve by adding a library version on array's prototype. – Anon. Dec 11 '09 at 11:48
7  
Yes, but it was worth mentioning. – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 14:23
5  
Best answer here, both for simplicity and working with non-numbers – Muhd Aug 10 '13 at 0:43

I have made a JsFiddle Banchmark test page for all the methods here, including the _underscore intersection function. (higher is better)

enter image description here

Till now intersect_safe gave the best results. YOU & Underscore the worst.

share|improve this answer
7  
Adding a break to Simple js loops increases the ops/sec to ~10M – Richard Aug 30 '12 at 16:17
1  
Fundamentally once we've found our intersecting item, i.e. when x[i] == y[z] we no longer need to execute the inner loop, which results in, surprising a lot, better performance! – Richard Aug 31 '12 at 7:52
1  
For fairly large arrays, however, the "Simple JS Loops" test loses steam: tinyurl.com/bo4lf2m . It looks as though as the arrays grow, intersect and intersect_safe are the best options by a large margin: tinyurl.com/bw52z9m (the latter image has over 1200 elements in each array, but this begins having significance at much lower array sizes) – DRobinson Dec 18 '12 at 21:48
18  
intersect_safe heavily relies on fact that arrays contain numbers in ascending order. On unsorted arrays this function will not work at all. – blazkovicz Jan 17 '14 at 7:27
4  
Thanks for this! I forked your fiddle to see if cacheing the array lengths in the "Simple js loops" version improved it at all, since the property wouldn't have to be looked up at each iteration. It squeezed about another 1M ops/sec. – mjswensen May 28 '14 at 21:56

I wish to add here this method also

var a = [1,2,3];
var b = [2,3,4,5];
var c = $(b).not($(b).not(a));
alert(c);
share|improve this answer
1  
This could also be written as c = $(b).filter(a);, but I wouldn't recommend relying on jQuery for this sort of array manipulation since the documentation only mentions that it works for elements. – Stryner Sep 23 '15 at 18:16

How about just using associative arrays?

function intersect(a, b) {
    var d1 = {};
    var d2 = {};
    var results = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        d1[a[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < b.length; j++) {
        d2[b[j]] = true;
    }
    for (var k in d1) {
        if (d2[k]) 
            results.push(k);
    }
    return results;
}

edit:

// new version
function intersect(a, b) {
    var d = {};
    var results = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
        d[b[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < a.length; j++) {
        if (d[a[j]]) 
            results.push(a[j]);
    }
    return results;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This only stands a chance if your arrays only contain strings or numbers, and if none of the script in your page has messed with Object.prototype. – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 10:49
    
The OP's example was using numbers, and if a script has messed with Object.prototype then the script should be rewritten or removed. – Steven Huwig Dec 11 '09 at 15:25
    
You don't need both (d1) and (d2). Create (d2), then loop through (a) instead of looping through (d1). – StanleyH Feb 23 '11 at 10:54
    
@StanleyH - thanks, I think you're right. – Steven Huwig Feb 23 '11 at 14:04
    
Should be d[b[i]] = true; instead of d[b[j]] = true; (i not j). But edit requires 6 chars. – Izhaki Jul 30 '12 at 1:59

The performance of @atk's implementation for sorted arrays of primitives can be improved by using .pop rather than .shift.

function intersect(array1, array2) {
   var result = [];
   // Don't destroy the original arrays
   var a = array1.slice(0);
   var b = array2.slice(0);
   var aLast = a.length - 1;
   var bLast = b.length - 1;
   while (aLast >= 0 && bLast >= 0) {
      if (a[aLast] > b[bLast] ) {
         a.pop();
         aLast--;
      } else if (a[aLast] < b[bLast] ){
         b.pop();
         bLast--;
      } else /* they're equal */ {
         result.push(a.pop());
         b.pop();
         aLast--;
         bLast--;
      }
   }
   return result;
}

I created a benchmark using jsPerf: http://bit.ly/P9FrZK. It's about three times faster to use .pop.

share|improve this answer
    
Just as a side note for others - this will only work for numbers, not strings. – Izhaki Jul 30 '12 at 0:15
    
Note that if you replace a[aLast] > b[bLast] with a[aLast].localeCompare(b[bLast]) > 0 (and same with the else if below) then this will work on strings. – andrew Jul 23 '13 at 5:10
    
The speed difference depends on the size of the arrays because .pop is O(1) and .shift() is O(n) – Esailija Jul 23 '13 at 8:53
  1. Sort it
  2. check one by one from the index 0, create new array from that.

Something like this, Not tested well though.

function intersection(x,y){
 x.sort();y.sort();
 var i=j=0;ret=[];
 while(i<x.length && j<y.length){
  if(x[i]<y[j])i++;
  else if(y[j]<x[i])j++;
  else {
   ret.push(x[i]);
   i++,j++;
  }
 }
 return ret;
}

alert(intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]));

PS:The algorithm only intended for Numbers and Normal Strings, intersection of arbitary object arrays may not work.

share|improve this answer
2  
Sorting will not necessarily help for arrays of arbitrary objects – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 10:47
    
If the array is not sorted, need to loop around 1,000,000 times when you intersect 1000 length array x 1000 length array – YOU Dec 11 '09 at 14:49
    
I think you missed my point, which is that arbitrary objects in JavaScript have no natural sort order, meaning that sorting an array of arbitrary objects will not result in equal objects being grouped. It's no good having an efficient algorithm that doesn't work. – Tim Down Dec 14 '09 at 2:08
    
Ah sorry, I missed "arbitrary objects", yes, You're right. those object cannot sort it, and the algorithm may not work on those. – YOU Dec 14 '09 at 2:10

For arrays containing only strings or numbers you can do something with sorting, as per some of the other answers. For the general case of arrays of arbitrary objects I don't think you can avoid doing it the long way. The following will give you the intersection of any number of arrays provided as parameters to arrayIntersection:

var arrayContains = Array.prototype.indexOf ?
    function(arr, val) {
        return arr.indexOf(val) > -1;
    } :
    function(arr, val) {
        var i = arr.length;
        while (i--) {
            if (arr[i] === val) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    };

function arrayIntersection() {
    var val, arrayCount, firstArray, i, j, intersection = [], missing;
    var arrays = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments); // Convert arguments into a real array

    // Search for common values
    firstArr = arrays.pop();
    if (firstArr) {
        j = firstArr.length;
        arrayCount = arrays.length;
        while (j--) {
            val = firstArr[j];
            missing = false;

            // Check val is present in each remaining array 
            i = arrayCount;
            while (!missing && i--) {
                if ( !arrayContains(arrays[i], val) ) {
                    missing = true;
                }
            }
            if (!missing) {
                intersection.push(val);
            }
        }
    }
    return intersection;
}

arrayIntersection( [1, 2, 3, "a"], [1, "a", 2], ["a", 1] ); // Gives [1, "a"];
share|improve this answer
    
This only works in the case where object identity is the only form of equality. – Steven Huwig Dec 15 '09 at 14:04
    
Well yes, but I think that's what would seem natural to most people. It's also trivial to plug in an alternative function to perform a different equality test. – Tim Down Dec 15 '09 at 19:31

I'll contribute with what has been working out best for me:

if (!Array.prototype.intersect){
Array.prototype.intersect = function (arr1) {

    var r = [], o = {}, l = this.length, i, v;
    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        o[this[i]] = true;
    }
    l = arr1.length;
    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        v = arr1[i];
        if (v in o) {
            r.push(v);
        }
    }
    return r;
};
}
share|improve this answer

With some restrictions on your data, you can do it in linear time!

For positive integers: use an array mapping the values to a "seen/not seen" boolean.

function intersectIntegers(array1,array2) { 
   var seen=[],
       result=[];
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     seen[array1[i]] = true;
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
     if ( seen[array2[i]])
        result.push(array2[i]);
   }
   return result;
}

There is a similar technique for objects: take a dummy key, set it to "true" for each element in array1, then look for this key in elements of array2. Clean up when you're done.

function intersectObjects(array1,array2) { 
   var result=[];
   var key="tmpKey_intersect"
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     array1[i][key] = true;
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
     if (array2[i][key])
        result.push(array2[i]);
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     delete array1[i][key];
   }
   return result;
}

Of course you need to be sure the key didn't appear before, otherwise you'll be destroying your data...

share|improve this answer
    
By the way, this can be easily extended to interesect any number of arrays: replace the boolean by integers, and increment each time it is seen: you can easily read the intersection on the last round. – tarulen Oct 5 '15 at 12:22
function intersection(A,B){
var result = new Array();
for (i=0; i<A.length; i++) {
    for (j=0; j<B.length; j++) {
        if (A[i] == B[j] && $.inArray(A[i],result) == -1) {
            result.push(A[i]);
        }
    }
}
return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for posting an answer! While a code snippet could answer the question it's still great to add some addition information around, like explain, etc .. – j0k Sep 23 '12 at 9:22

"indexOf" for IE 9.0, chrome, firefox, opera,

    function intersection(a,b){
     var rs = [], x = a.length;
     while (x--) b.indexOf(a[x])!=-1 && rs.push(a[x]);
     return rs.sort();
    }

intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]);
//Result:  [2,3]
share|improve this answer

A tiny tweak to the smallest one here (the filter/indexOf solution), namely creating an index of the values in one of the arrays using a JavaScript object, will reduce it from O(N*M) to "probably" linear time. source1 source2

function intersect(a, b) {
  var aa = {};
  a.forEach(function(v) { aa[v]=1; });
  return b.filter(function(v) { return v in aa; });
}

This isn't the very simplest solution (it's more code than filter+indexOf), nor is it the very fastest (probably slower by a constant factor than intersect_safe()), but seems like a pretty good balance. It is on the very simple side, while providing good performance, and it doesn't require pre-sorted inputs.

share|improve this answer

If your environment supports ECMAScript 6 Set, one simple and supposedly efficient (see specification link) way:

function intersect(a, b) {
  var setA = new Set(a);
  var setB = new Set(b);
  var intersection = new Set([...setA].filter(x => setB.has(x)));
  return Array.from(intersection);
}

Note that the set implementation will only allow unique values, thus new Set[1,2,3,3].size evaluates to 3.

share|improve this answer

Here's a very naive implementation I'm using. It's non-destructive and also makes sure not to duplicate entires.

Array.prototype.contains = function(elem) {
    return(this.indexOf(elem) > -1);
};

Array.prototype.intersect = function( array ) {
    // this is naive--could use some optimization
    var result = [];
    for ( var i = 0; i < this.length; i++ ) {
        if ( array.contains(this[i]) && !result.contains(this[i]) )
            result.push( this[i] );
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

intersection of N arrays in coffeescript

getIntersection: (arrays) ->
    if not arrays.length
        return []
    a1 = arrays[0]
    for a2 in arrays.slice(1)
        a = (val for val in a1 when val in a2)
        a1 = a
    return a1.unique()
share|improve this answer

not about efficiency, but easy to follow, here is an example of unions and intersections of sets, it handles arrays of sets and sets of sets.

http://jsfiddle.net/zhulien/NF68T/

// process array [element, element...], if allow abort ignore the result
function processArray(arr_a, cb_a, blnAllowAbort_a)
{
    var arrResult = [];
    var blnAborted = false;
    var intI = 0;

    while ((intI < arr_a.length) && (blnAborted === false))
    {
        if (blnAllowAbort_a)
        {
            blnAborted = cb_a(arr_a[intI]);
        }
        else
        {
            arrResult[intI] = cb_a(arr_a[intI]);
        }
        intI++;
    }

    return arrResult;
}

// process array of operations [operation,arguments...]
function processOperations(arrOperations_a)
{
    var arrResult = [];
    var fnOperationE;

    for(var intI = 0, intR = 0; intI < arrOperations_a.length; intI+=2, intR++) 
    {
        var fnOperation = arrOperations_a[intI+0];
        var fnArgs = arrOperations_a[intI+1];
        if (fnArgs === undefined)
        {
            arrResult[intR] = fnOperation();
        }
        else
        {
            arrResult[intR] = fnOperation(fnArgs);
        }
    }

    return arrResult;
}

// return whether an element exists in an array
function find(arr_a, varElement_a)
{
    var blnResult = false;

    processArray(arr_a, function(varToMatch_a)
    {
        var blnAbort = false;

        if (varToMatch_a === varElement_a)
        {
            blnResult = true;
            blnAbort = true;
        }

        return blnAbort;
    }, true);

    return blnResult;
}

// return the union of all sets
function union(arr_a)
{
    var arrResult = [];
    var intI = 0;

    processArray(arr_a, function(arrSet_a)
    {
        processArray(arrSet_a, function(varElement_a)
        {
            // if the element doesn't exist in our result
            if (find(arrResult, varElement_a) === false)
            {
                // add it
                arrResult[intI] = varElement_a;
                intI++;
            }
        });
    });

    return arrResult;
}

// return the intersection of all sets
function intersection(arr_a)
{
    var arrResult = [];
    var intI = 0;

    // for each set
    processArray(arr_a, function(arrSet_a)
    {
        // every number is a candidate
        processArray(arrSet_a, function(varCandidate_a)
        {
            var blnCandidate = true;

            // for each set
            processArray(arr_a, function(arrSet_a)
            {
                // check that the candidate exists
                var blnFoundPart = find(arrSet_a, varCandidate_a);

                // if the candidate does not exist
                if (blnFoundPart === false)
                {
                    // no longer a candidate
                    blnCandidate = false;
                }
            });

            if (blnCandidate)
            {
                // if the candidate doesn't exist in our result
                if (find(arrResult, varCandidate_a) === false)
                {
                    // add it
                    arrResult[intI] = varCandidate_a;
                    intI++;
                }
            }
        });
    });

    return arrResult;
}

var strOutput = ''

var arrSet1 = [1,2,3];
var arrSet2 = [2,5,6];
var arrSet3 = [7,8,9,2];

// return the union of the sets
strOutput = union([arrSet1, arrSet2, arrSet3]);
alert(strOutput);

// return the intersection of 3 sets
strOutput = intersection([arrSet1, arrSet2, arrSet3]);
alert(strOutput);

// of 3 sets of sets, which set is the intersecting set
strOutput = processOperations([intersection,[[arrSet1, arrSet2], [arrSet2], [arrSet2, arrSet3]]]);
alert(strOutput);
share|improve this answer

Another indexed approach able to process any number of arrays at once:

// Calculate intersection of multiple array or object values.
function intersect (arrList) {
    var arrLength = Object.keys(arrList).length;
        // (Also accepts regular objects as input)
    var index = {};
    for (var i in arrList) {
        for (var j in arrList[i]) {
            var v = arrList[i][j];
            if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = 0;
            index[v]++;
        };
    };
    var retv = [];
    for (var i in index) {
        if (index[i] == arrLength) retv.push(i);
    };
    return retv;
};

It works only for values that can be evaluated as strings and you should pass them as an array like:

intersect ([arr1, arr2, arr3...]);

...but it transparently accepts objects as parameter or as any of the elements to be intersected (always returning array of common values). Examples:

intersect ({foo: [1, 2, 3, 4], bar: {a: 2, j:4}}); // [2, 4]
intersect ([{x: "hello", y: "world"}, ["hello", "user"]]); // ["hello"]
share|improve this answer

Here is underscore.js implementation:

_.intersection = function(array) {
  if (array == null) return [];
  var result = [];
  var argsLength = arguments.length;
  for (var i = 0, length = array.length; i < length; i++) {
    var item = array[i];
    if (_.contains(result, item)) continue;
    for (var j = 1; j < argsLength; j++) {
      if (!_.contains(arguments[j], item)) break;
    }
    if (j === argsLength) result.push(item);
  }
  return result;
};

Source: http://underscorejs.org/docs/underscore.html#section-62

share|improve this answer
    
Not a bad reference if undesrcore is available – dimitris mistriotis Nov 23 '15 at 13:00

I forked mjswensen's benchmark to add an indexOf test (see mjswensen's benchmark and newswf's earlier benchmark). indexOf is terse and still works if you don't want to pre-sort the arrays.

var ret = [];
for (var i = 0; i < x.length; i++) {
    if (y.indexOf(x[i]) !== -1) {
        ret.push(i);
    }
}

Using indexOf in a filter is enticingly terse but performs poorly.

return x.filter(function (i) {
    return y.indexOf(i) !== -1;
})

The results were surprisingly varied (they were run sequentially in different tabs in the same browser) but showed indexOf loop in the top cluster.

chrome bestchrome worst firefox bestfirefox worst

meta: folks can continue to fork, adding new algorithms and helping hackers make principled choices.

share|improve this answer

My contribution in ES6 terms. In general it finds the intersection of an array with indefinite number of arrays provided as arguments.

Array.prototype.intersect = function(...a) {
  return [this,...a].reduce((p,c) => p.filter(e => c.includes(e)));
}
var arrs = [[0,2,4,6,8],[4,5,6,7],[4,6]],
     arr = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

document.write("<pre>" + JSON.stringify(arr.intersect(...arrs)) + "</pre>");

share|improve this answer

"filter" and "indexOf" aren't supported on Array in IE. How about this:

var array1 = [1, 2, 3];
var array2 = [2, 3, 4, 5];

var intersection = [];
for (i in array1) {
    for (j in array2) {
        if (array1[i] == array2[j]) intersection.push(array1[i]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
7  
don't ever use for .. in on arrays. ever. geez. – nickf Dec 11 '09 at 14:48
    
Well he said "no library" so it should be safe from iterable Array prototype extensions. But ya, that's good general advice. – jpsimons Dec 12 '09 at 0:47
    
in arrays you should iterate through its indexes. for() will give you also other non-numeric members, you would not ever need to touch. – seva.lapsha Apr 8 '14 at 18:11

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