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I learned C programming language three years back and now when i am revisiting it after the experience of java and c# i'm facing some issues with pointers. So i tried to write a simple matrix addition program but i don't know why i'm getting some strange values while printing the matrices.

Code:

#include <stdio.h>

int* sumOfMat(int* m1,int* m2)
{
    printf("Matrix A: \n");
    printMat(m1);
    printf("Matrix B: \n");
    printMat(m2);
    int mat3[3][3];
    int row=0,col=0,k=0,sum=0;
    for(;row<3;row++)
    {
        col=0;
        for (;col<3 ;col++ )
        {
            sum=(*m1+*m2);
            m1++;
            m2++;
            mat3[row][col]=sum;
        }
    }

    printf("Result: \n");
//    printMat(mat3);  //this statement is giving me a correct output.
    return mat3;
}

void printMat(const int m[3][3])
{
    int row,col;
    for (row=0;row<3 ;row++ )
    {
        for (col=0;col<3 ;col++ )
        {
            printf("%d\t",m[row][col]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }

}


int main(void) {
int mat1[3][3]={{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}};
int mat2[3][3]={{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}};
//add
printf("Sum of the metrices : \n");
int* x=sumOfMat(&mat1,&mat2);
printMat(x);   // this call is providing me some garbage values at some locations.
return 0;
}

Output:

Success  time: 0 memory: 2292 signal:0
Sum of the metrices : 
Matrix A: 
1   2   3   
4   5   6   
7   8   9   
Matrix B: 
1   2   3   
4   5   6   
7   8   9   
Result: 
2   134514448   134514448   
8   10  12  
14  16  -1216458764 

Demo

Question: Why i'm getting this error and how to correct it.

share|improve this question
2  
For one, mat3 is declared on the stack, but it is returned and used (after it is popped from stack). There are other issues. – Peter L. Sep 17 '13 at 17:28
up vote 5 down vote accepted

the line

int mat3[3][3];

allocates your 2d array on the stack

You're returning a pointer to this array.

return mat3;

Unfortunately when the function call ends the stack is unwound and the memory for the array is no longer there, so you have a pointer to garbage.

One solution is to allocate the array in your main function and pass it into sumOfMat as a parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
This was my first attempt when i was explaining the result of function call from the function itself but why i'm getting incorrect for only three places? was it by chance only or something else ? – Arpit Sep 17 '13 at 17:31
1  
@Arpit if I understand your comment rightly, I think you're asking why are some of the numbers correct and some incorrect? This is because the memory for your 2d array won't get overwritten with other stuff immediately, so some correct values will persist for a while. (From a language the behaviour is undefined, so the result of trying to access that memory is unpredictable.) – TooTone Sep 17 '13 at 17:38
    
Ok. Got it now. Thanks for your help. – Arpit Sep 17 '13 at 17:41

Never return a pointer to an automatic variable:

int *f(void)
{
    int i;
    ....
    return &i;
}

The variable i doesn't exist once f returns, so the pointer to it will be invalid.
In your case mat3 is an automatic variable and sumOfMat() returns a pointer to mat3 which does't exist once sumOfMat() returns.
One of the solution for your problem is, define mat3 as global variable.

Further I pointed out one major problem with your code:

Return type ofsumOfMat(int* m1,int* m2) is pointer to integer (int *) while you are returning mat3 which is of type int(*)[3].
I got lots of warnings while compiling your code. I corrected most of them.
Modified code:

#include <stdio.h>
void printMat(int *m);
int* sumOfMat(int* m1,int* m2);
int mat3[3][3];

int* sumOfMat(int* m1,int* m2)
{
    printf("Matrix A: \n");
    printMat(m1);
    printf("Matrix B: \n");
    printMat(m2);
    //int mat3[3][3];
    int row=0,col=0,sum=0;
    for(;row<3;row++)
    {
        col=0;
        for (;col<3 ;col++ )
        {
            sum=(*m1+*m2);
            m1++;
            m2++;
            mat3[row][col]=sum;
        }
    }

   printf("Result: \n");
   //    printMat(mat3);  //this statement is giving me a correct output.
   return mat3[0];
}

void printMat(int *m)
{
    int row;
    for (row=1;row<=9 ;row++)
        {
            printf("%d\t",*m++);
            if(row%3 == 0)
                printf("\n");
        }
   /* {
        for (col=0;col<3 ;col++ )
        {
            printf("%d\t",m[row][col]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }*/

}


int main(void) {
int mat1[3][3]={{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}};
int mat2[3][3]={{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}};
//add
printf("Sum of the metrices : \n");
int* x=sumOfMat(&mat1[0][0],&mat2[0][0]);
printMat(x);   // this call is providing me some garbage values at some locations.
return 0;
}  
share|improve this answer

It is because you are returning mat3 which is a local variable defined as

int mat3[3][3];

To correct this either do a dynamic allocation of mat3 using malloc OR pass it as a out variable in the function sumOfMat as third variable.

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