Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have some tables which keep track of processed transactions. These tables have millions of rows. Often times I want to look at the most recent X transactions, so I have a query like this to pull the info I want from a few tables:

select a.id, b.field_one, c.field_two
from trans a, table_two b, table_three c
where a.id = b.id
and a.id = c.id
and a.id in
  (select id from trans where id > (select max(id) from trans) - 100);

Right now the query is very slow. The explain plan shows a full table scan on B and C. Now, if I evaluate the nested query separately and replace it with a list of comma separated IDs, the query is very fast. This seems obvious to me - it will only have 100 rows to join together so of course it will be faster than if it answered the query by first joining A and B together.

Conceptually I understand the query optimizer is trying to find a good execution plan but in this case it seems like it is doing a terrible job. Is there any way to force the DBMS to execute the nested query first? Possibly by using a Hint?

Thanks

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your method is probably obsuring the fact that only a maximum of 100 rows are being selected from trans.

Try this:

with cte_last_trans as (
  select id
  from   (select   id
          from     trans
          where    id > (select max(id)-100 from trans)
          order by id desc)
  where  rownum <= 100)
select a.id,
       b.field_one,
       c.field_two
from   cte_last_trans a,
       table_two      b,
       table_three    c
where  a.id = b.id
and    a.id = c.id

By the way, have you thought of the possibility that not all values of id might be present? If you want 100 rows to be returned, use:

with cte_last_trans as (
  select id
  from   (select   id
          from     trans
          order by id desc)
  where  rownum <= 100)
select a.id,
       b.field_one,
       c.field_two
from   cte_last_trans a,
       table_two      b,
       table_three    c
where  a.id = b.id
and    a.id = c.id
share|improve this answer
    
I got this approach working - the query executes very quickly. I think the key is rownum <= 100. I tried a few other things too (hints) but this is the only way that really speeds up the query. –  emulcahy Sep 18 '13 at 14:39

You can use a NO_MERGE hint which will force Oracle to execute the inner query first and not try to merge the two queries. Here's an example:

SELECT /*+NO_MERGE(seattle_dept)*/ e1.last_name, seattle_dept.department_name 
  FROM employees e1, 
    (SELECT location_id, department_id, department_name 
       FROM departments 
      WHERE location_id = 1700) seattle_dept 
  WHERE e1.department_id = seattle_dept.department_id;



select /*+ no_merge(inner) */ a.id, b.field_one, c.field_two
  from trans a, 
       table_two b, 
       table_three c, 
       (select id from trans where id > (select max(id) from trans) - 100) inner
 where a.id = b.id
   and a.id = c.id
   and a.id = inner.id;
share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to mention that I'm not sure the no_merge hint works with in clauses. YOu may have to re-write the query to use a inline query. –  Chris H Sep 17 '13 at 20:15
    
You can disable subquery unnesting with the NO_UNNEST hint. –  Jon Heller Sep 17 '13 at 22:25
    
Tossing a +1 here because this is the answer I was looking for.. But even with the hint it was still doing a FTS, so it appears the hint didn't really change anything. –  emulcahy Sep 18 '13 at 14:37
    
You may need to force an index scan on the inner query with a hint on the nested select. –  Chris H Sep 18 '13 at 16:04

The in does not seem to do anything have you tried removing it?

select a.id, b.field_one, c.field_two
from trans a, table_two b, table_three c
where a.id = b.id
and a.id = c.id
and a.id > (select max(id) from trans) - 100;
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't the IN clause limit the results to only the most recent 100 inserts? –  MJB Sep 17 '13 at 18:11
    
There is no reason to have the nested select in the in clause. All it did was ensure id was in the list of the ids greater than max(id) - 100. The same thing can be accomplished by directly comparing id to max(id) - 100. –  Brian Sep 17 '13 at 19:10
    
I agree that it could be done easier. I just meant that it did actually do something, as opposed to nothing. –  MJB Sep 19 '13 at 16:14

You could simply filter the 100 record in the primary trans table itself instead of joing it again and again.

select a.id, b.field_one, c.field_two
from 
(select id from (select id, row_number() over(order by id desc) rn 
from trans) where rn <=100) a, 
table_two b, table_three c
where a.id = b.id
and a.id = c.id;
share|improve this answer
  select a.id, b.field_one, c.field_two
 from trans a, table_two b, table_three c
 where a.id = b.id
 and a.id = c.id
 and a.id between (select max(id)-100 from trans) and (select max(id) from trans)
share|improve this answer
    
Erm ... you'd want the lower value as the first argument afet BETWEEN. I'm not sure that this would work though -- the optimiser is not necessarily going to realise that only about 100 rows of trans will be returned. Check the explain plan, though. –  David Aldridge Sep 17 '13 at 18:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.