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Im trying to get how can I access properties from another constructor. I want to separate objects like App, Effects, Utils for example and call properties and methods from one to another. Is that possible, or is this way completely wrong way?

var App = function() {

    this.someProperty = 'Lorem';
    this.init();
};

App.prototype = {

    init:function(){
        this.bindEvents();
    },

    bindEvents:function(){

        var self = this;

        $(window).on('resize', function(e) {
            e.preventDefault();
            this.windowWidth = $(window).width();
            // Is that Correct?
            Utils.prototype.resizeElement(this.windowWidth);
        });

    }

};


var Utils = function(){};


Utils.prototype = {

    resizeElement: function(windowW){
        console.log(windowW);   
    },

    someMethod:function(){

        // How can i access property written in App constructor?
        console.log(this.someProperty);
    }

};


var Effects = function(){
    this.init();
};


Effects.prototype = {

    hideElement:function(ele){
        $(ele).hide();
    }

};


var app = new App();
share|improve this question
    
Not sure what you're asking. I don't see an init declaration for Effects. Are you saying you'd want that to call App.init? – Eli Gassert Sep 17 '13 at 19:14
    
For example in object App method bindEvents i want to call method resizeElement that is in object Utils, am I doing it correctly? Or for eg. i want to read property this.someProperty that is defined in App object but i want to read it in Utils object..did you get it? – Martin Sep 17 '13 at 19:18
    
Ok I answered. You are confusing object (instance) and class here. Look at my examples. – Eli Gassert Sep 17 '13 at 19:25
up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you have classes, the classes themselves don't serve for much. Instances of classes are what you want. So calling Utils.resizeElement from App wouldn't do anything, as resizeElement is a part of the prototype (i.e. part of what an instance gets, not what the class itself gets).

You need to decide if you're grouping methods and concepts into a single-instance, in which case you could just use a JS object, such as:

var Utils = {
  resizeElement: function(window) { ... }
}

If you had an object called Utils that had a method property called resizeElement then you could call it from App with Utils.resizeElement.

If you truly want a class, then you have two choices: 1) pass an instance of a Utils to your App or create a new instance inside App.

Option 1:

var App = function(utils) {
    this.utils = utils;
    this.someProperty = 'Lorem';
    this.init();
};

App.prototype = {

    init: function(){
        this.bindEvents();
        this.utils.resizeElement(...);
    }
}

var u = new Utils();
var a = new App(u);

Or do it internally

var App = function() {
    this.utils = new Utils();
    this.someProperty = 'Lorem';
    this.init();
};

App.prototype = {

    init: function(){
        this.bindEvents();
        this.utils.resizeElement(...);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great, working good, thanks!! and can i ask you one more thing, how can i read the property that is defined in App constructor? is that possible or i need to pass as argument to method? – Martin Sep 17 '13 at 19:37
    
What property in the app constructor? this.someProperty = 'Lorem';? If so, then you can access it once you've created an instance of App, such as: var a = new App(); alert(a.someProperty); – Eli Gassert Sep 17 '13 at 19:48

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