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In my css file is .a.b different than .a .b?

It's a simple question but it's always annoyed me. I tried it, but figured I would post it here in case this was useful as a reference.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

In my css file is .a.b different than .a .b?

Yes

.a.b is one or more elements with both classes.

<div class="a b">(target)</div>

.a .b is one or more elements with class b with any parent element with class a

<div class="a"><div class="b">(target)</div></div>

or even

<div class="a">
  <div>
    <div>
      <div class="b">(target)</div>
   </div>
   <div class="b">(target)</div>
   <div class="b">(target)
     <div class="b">(target)</div></div>
  </div>
</div>

They are very different.

I chose the direction in the example .a .b from right to left as all .b elements are the ones that will be the target for the CCS.

Additionally you could even do div.a.b for my first example and div.a div.b for the second examples.

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2  
ie. classes together means on the same element; classes space separated is descendant elements, left to right. –  Orbling Sep 17 '13 at 19:30
  • .a.b means "an element with both class a and class b"

    Example:

    <div class="a b">(element)</div>
    
  • .a .b means "an element with class b for which either its parent or grand-parent or grand-grand-parent, etc, has class a"

    Examples:

    <div class="a">
      <div class="b">(element)</div>
    </div>
    
    <div class="a">
      <div class="c">
        <div class="b">(element)</div>
      </div>
    </div>
    
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YES! They are different!

.a.b is an element with both classes a and b

<span class="a b"></span>

.a .b is an element where a is the parent or higher of class b

<span class="a">
    <span class="b">
    </span>
</span>
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