Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm just started learning C++ and as exercise I'm implementing a linked list the OOP way.

So far I have these classes:

template<class T> 
class List 
{
    public:
        //Class declarations.
        class Iterator;
        class ConstIterator;

        //Constructors and Destructors.
        List() : head(NULL), tail(NULL), size(0) {} //Constructor
        ~List(); //Destructor

        //Methods
        Iterator<T> begin();
        Iterator<T> end();
        void insert(const T& data);
        void insert(const T& data, const Iterator<T>& iterator);
        void remove(const Iterator<T>& iterator);
        int getSize() const;
        Iterator<T> find();
        void sort();

    private:
        class Node<T>;
        Node<T>* head;
        Node<T>* tail;
        int size;
};


template<class T> 
class List<class T>::Iterator 
{
    public:
        Iterator(); //Constructor
        ~Iterator(); //Destructor

        T& operator ++ ();
        T operator ++ (int);
        T& operator -- ();
        T operator -- (int);
        bool operator == (const Iterator<T>& iterator) const;
        bool operator != (const Iterator<T>& iterator) const;
        T& operator * ();

    private:
        List<T>* list;
        Node<T>* node;
};


template<class T>
class List<class T>::ConstIterator 
{
    public:
        ConstIterator(); //Constructor
        ~ConstIterator(); //Destructor

        T& operator ++ ();
        T operator ++ (int);
        T& operator -- ();
        T operator -- (int);
        bool operator == (const ConstIterator<T>& iterator) const;
        bool operator != (const ConstIterator<T>& iterator) const;
        T& operator * ();

    private:
        const List<T> * list;
        const Node<T> * node;
};


template<class T>
class List<class T>::Node
{
    public:
        Node(const T& _data, const Node* _next = NULL) : data(_data), next(_next) {} //Constructor
        ~Node(); //Destructor 

    private:
        T data;
        Node* next;
};

List() : head(NULL), tail(NULL), size(0){}

template<class T>
Iterator<T> List<T>::begin() {return Iterator<T>(this, head);}

template<class T>
Iterator<T> List<T>::end() {return Iterator<T>(this, tail);}

I wrote the following insert method:

template<class T>
void List<T>::insert(const T& data)
{
    Node newNode = new Node(data, NULL);

    if (head == NULL)
    {
        head = &newNode;
        tail = &newNode;
    }
    else
    {
        (*tail)->next = &newNode;
        tail = &newNode
    }
    size++
}

Now I have few questions: 1. Am I writing true C++ style? [I don't wont to write C code, or writing code in C style] 2. Will the new node will be created with the original data and not its copy? [Is this a good idea to implement this without copying the data before inserting it into a node and into the list?]

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Ali, Elazar, KillianDS, Jonathan Wakely, Joe Gauterin Sep 17 '13 at 21:48

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
After you have finished learning, please use std::list. –  Ali Sep 17 '13 at 21:35
6  
This question should be migrated to codereview.stackexchange.com –  Ali Sep 17 '13 at 21:36
1  
Sure I will, I'm aware of std::list however this is irrelevant to my question. –  Doppelganger Sep 17 '13 at 21:36
2  
1. No, the definition you present here won't even compile. Node<T> head; for example, is not legal C++, as Node<T> is an incomplete type. Iterator<T> isn't legal where it is used either. Iterator isn't the template; List is. 2. Hard to say while (1) is still a problem. –  WhozCraig Sep 17 '13 at 21:37
1  
It seems you declarations don't match your code: head and tail in List<T> need to be pointers according to the code in insert(). –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 17 '13 at 21:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The style question is too open ended. The question on the copy can be answered, though: Your nodes will contain a copy of the argument given to List<T>::insert(const T& data): Since the argument is a const T&, the list can't do anything with this object other than copy it. You could play some tricks and add an overload using

void List<T>::insert(T&& data) {
    Node<T>* newNode = new Node<T>(std::move(data), 0);
    // ...
}

to have data moved rather than copied when it is coming from a temporary object (or is, at least, made to look like a temporary using std::move()). This is, however, still not an in place construction of the object.

Note that your insert() function is also misnamed: it should be called push_back() as this is the name used for the method appending to a C++ container. It doesn't have to be called push_back() but since it behaves like push_back() it eases use of your class. Of course, you are probably better off to use std::list<T> anyway (although sometimes there are reason to create a custom container).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I'm just impressed you go this to compile. My clang is puking all over the posted code. –  WhozCraig Sep 17 '13 at 21:47
    
@Dietmar Kühl, do you agree with WhozCraig comment in which he states that the code is incorect on a syntax level? –  Doppelganger Sep 17 '13 at 21:50
    
@WhozCraig: I didn't claim I got anything to compile. However, I don't need the code to compile to realize that const T& data will result in data being copied. ;-) –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 17 '13 at 21:50
    
@Doppelganger: there were a number of blatant errors. For example, there was no declaration of Node, i.e., I assumed it would be an externally declared node class (in which case it would require a template argument of type T). Since I wrote my response the code got added to add the "declaration" class Node<T>; but template can't be declared like that. head and tail weren't pointers (seems they are now). I'd be surprised if everything go fixed but I didn't try to compile. –  Dietmar Kühl Sep 17 '13 at 21:55

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.