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I'm looking for a general approach to combine two matrices so that the columns from the two initial matrices alternate in the new matrix

col1m1...col1m2...col2m1...col2m2...col3m1...col3m2......

for example:

matrix.odd  <- matrix(c(rep(1,3),rep(3,3),rep(5,3)),nrow=3,ncol=3)
matrix.even <- matrix(c(rep(2,3),rep(4,3),rep(6,3)),nrow=3,ncol=3)
# would look like
matrix.combined <- matrix(c(rep(1,3),rep(2,3),rep(3,3),rep(4,3),rep(5,3),rep(6,3)),
                          nrow=3,ncol=6)

I'm looking for a general approach because I will have matrix combinations with more than just 3 columns. I've tried some for loops and some if statements but it isn't really coming together for me. Searches on combining matrices with shuffle and with alternation have not proven fruitful either. Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted
rows.combined <- nrow(matrix.odd) 
cols.combined <- ncol(matrix.odd) + ncol(matrix.even)
matrix.combined <- matrix(NA, nrow=rows.combined, ncol=cols.combined)
matrix.combined[, seq(1, cols.combined, 2)] <- matrix.odd
matrix.combined[, seq(2, cols.combined, 2)] <- matrix.even
share|improve this answer
    
@zero323 I tried adapting this for rows by doing matrix.combined(seq(1, rows.combined,2), ] but it adds the first matrix and not the second one. How can this be used for rows ? – Anusha Oct 30 '14 at 8:23

Smth like this should do:

m <- cbind(matrix.odd, matrix.even)                   # combine
m <- m[, c(matrix(1:ncol(m), nrow = 2, byrow = T))]   # then reorder

Another option for fun:

matrix(rbind(matrix.odd, matrix.even), nrow = nrow(matrix.odd))

And to play the many matrices game:

weave = function(...) {
  l = list(...)
  matrix(do.call(rbind, l), nrow = nrow(l[[1]]))
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice solution. But I suggest specifying byrow=TRUE as T can be rebound by the user. – Jason Morgan Sep 17 '13 at 23:18
    
@eddi Could you please show how to adapt this for combining row wise ? Thanks. – Anusha Oct 30 '14 at 8:28
    
@Anusha matrix(t(cbind(matrix.odd, matrix.even)), ncol = ncol(matrix.odd), byrow = T) maybe? – eddi Oct 30 '14 at 15:10
    
@eddi Thanks. I was trying with bycol which I dont think is defined. – Anusha Oct 30 '14 at 16:05
    
Benchmarking, I found your first suggestion to be the fastest solution, with @flodel's about the same. Your "other option for fun" seemed to be about 20% slower in comparison. (Zero's solution took just under twice the time, and Simon's solution just over twice the same, but this was slightly dependent on the shape of the matrices .) – Silverfish Mar 30 at 11:41
alternate.cols <- function(m1, m2) {
  cbind(m1, m2)[, order(c(seq(ncol(m1)), seq(ncol(m2))))]
}

identical(matrix.combined, alternate.cols(matrix.odd, matrix.even))
# [1] TRUE

which also does the right thing (subjective) if m1 and m2 have a different number of columns:

alternate.cols(matrix.odd, matrix.even[, -3])
#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
# [1,]    1    2    3    4    5
# [2,]    1    2    3    4    5
# [3,]    1    2    3    4    5

It is easy to generalize to any number of matrices:

alternate.cols <- function(...) {
  l <- list(...)
  m <- do.call(cbind, l)
  i <- order(sequence(sapply(l, ncol)))
  m[, i]
}
share|improve this answer

You could turn into a 3D array and then transpose...

arr <- array( c(m1,m2) , dim = c(dim(m1),2) )
matrix( aperm( arr , c(1,3,2) ) , nrow(m1) )
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5    6
[2,]    1    2    3    4    5    6
[3,]    1    2    3    4    5    6

And as a function, generalisable to many matrices...

bindR <- function(...){
    args <- list(...)
    dims <- c( dim(args[[1]]) , length(args) )
    arr <- array( unlist( args ) , dim = dims )
    matrix( aperm( arr , c(1,3,2) ) , dims[1] )
}


bindR(m1,m2,m1,m2)
#     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10] [,11] [,12]
#[1,]    1    2    1    2    3    4    3    4    5     6     5     6
#[2,]    1    2    1    2    3    4    3    4    5     6     5     6
#[3,]    1    2    1    2    3    4    3    4    5     6     5     6
share|improve this answer
    
this is cool :) – eddi Sep 17 '13 at 23:22
    
@eddi thank you! – Simon O'Hanlon Sep 17 '13 at 23:30

There is likely a more succinct way to do this. If the matrices are large, you will likely need to look for a more efficient method.

# Test data
(X <- matrix(1:16, nrow=4, ncol=4))
(Y <- matrix(-16:-1, nrow=4, ncol=4))

# Set indices for the new matrix
X.idx <- seq(1, ncol(X)*2, by=2)
Y.idx <- seq(2, ncol(Y)*2+1, by=2)

# Column bind the matrices and name columns according to the indices
XY <- cbind(X, Y)
colnames(XY) <- c(X.idx, Y.idx)

# Now order the columns
XY[, order(as.numeric(colnames(XY)))]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I was trying this with a little larger set of matrices (5 columns each). All was going well until the last command where it orders the column.s I am getting the ordering 1,10,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. Does this need an "as.numeric" argument? I'll try some things out. – Will Phillips Sep 17 '13 at 23:26
    
You are right. I will change it, though eddi's solution is likely better. – Jason Morgan Sep 17 '13 at 23:30

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