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What's the difference between doing this:

class UserRepository extends DAO
{
    public function GetAllUsers()
    {
        return $this->Select();
    }

    public function GetUserById( $id )
    {
        return $this->Select( $id );    
    }
}

class MockUserRepository extends MockDAO
{
    public function GetAllUsers()
    {
        return $this->Select();
    }

    public function GetUserById( $id )
    {
        return $this->Select( $id );    
    }
}

class UserController
{
    private $userRepository;

    function __Construct( $repo )
    {
        $this->userRepository = $repo;
    }

    public function ListUsers()
    {
        $users = $this->userRepository->AnUndeclaredMethod();
        // ...
    }
}

$repo = new MockUserRepository();
$controller = new UserController( $repo );

and this:

interface IUserRepository
{
    public function GetAllUsers();
    public function GetUserById( $id );
}

class UserRepository extends DAO implements IUserRepository
{
    public function GetAllUsers()
    {
        return $this->Select();
    }

    public function GetUserById( $id )
    {
        return $this->Select( $id );    
    }
}

class MockUserRepository extends MockDAO implements IUserRepository
{
    public function GetAllUsers()
    {
        return $this->SelectUsers();
    }

    public function GetUserById( $id )
    {
        return $this->SelectUsers( $id );            
    }
}

class UserController
{
    private $userRepository;

    public function __Construct( IUserRepository $repo )
    {
        $this->userRepository = $repo;
    }

    public function ListUsers()
    {
        $users = $this->userRepository->AnUndeclaredMethod();
        // ...
    }
}
$repo = new MockUserRepository();
$controller = new UserController( $repo );

If a function was used in the controller that wasn't declared in one of the repositories, it would throw an error anyway, why is it better to use an interface for this type of task? What do I benefit from?

  1. Is it all about the error? if you forget to implement one function you know must exist, it errors regardless of using it or not, is that the benefit of the interface?
  2. Is it about the fact that you may need 2 repositories for 2 data sources and so without knowing your application would just stop working if your controller called upon the function that wasn't implemented rather than straight away alerting you to the fact one of your repositories is not implementing the methods you have told it to in the interface? Once again, is it all about the errors?
share|improve this question
    
Not it's all about depending on contract, rather than on implementation. The consumer may only rely on presence of one method interface defines, which might be implemented by multiple various classes. –  zerkms Sep 18 '13 at 0:57
    
contract? could you clarify?... (after your edit, not sure I understand what you mean). –  Jimmyt1988 Sep 18 '13 at 0:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

An interface forces any objects using the interface, to make callable, methods within the interface, also known as implementation. So if you have two different classes which use the same interface, they both must have the same method (save() for example). Even though each class must have a save method, the code within the method can be completely different, the important point is that each class has a save() method.

I've seen interfaces used with factories which may create various objects. So calling code makes a call to a factory with various params, an object is returned, and because the objects created within the factory adhered to an interface, we can safely make a call to save() without knowing which object was actually created.

share|improve this answer
    
But in terms of the visual difference between them both, is it strictly down to the errors they serve? Regardless of if you've created one of the classes that implements the interface, you've had to declare the other method even though you may yet to implement it and call it in your application. You now what, I think I understand it. –  Jimmyt1988 Sep 18 '13 at 8:47
1  
Right, if a class implements an interface, it must make callable any method definitions found within the interface, otherwise you will get an error. If you implement an interface and don't need to code out one of the methods you could just define it, but not make it do anything. –  Mike Purcell Sep 18 '13 at 17:34

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