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I know the difference between Cache.Insert and Cache.Add, but what about Cache["Key"] = "Value"?

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marked as duplicate by COLD TOLD, BrokenGlass, Ahmad Mageed, wudzik, talonmies Sep 18 '13 at 6:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
The later doesn't allow you to set any of the caching options it will just override \ add to the cache context. In both add and insert you can set other details including expiration policy, call backs etc. –  Nico Sep 18 '13 at 1:52
    
If so, what is the default caching option in this case? (Absolute Expiration Time and Sliding Expiration Time) –  J - C Sharper Sep 18 '13 at 1:53
    
According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa478965.aspx (section header Caching API, Using the Cache Object) stores without any dependencies. The cache engine determines when \ if it will expire. Cheers –  Nico Sep 18 '13 at 1:56
    
How to set default cache expiration time instead of letting it decide by itself? –  J - C Sharper Sep 18 '13 at 1:59
    
Use Add \ Insert instead... Or if you want to get fancy you can write your own wrapper that calls the insert \ add method yourself setting your options. –  Nico Sep 18 '13 at 2:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is an example of writing a very simple wrapper (in response to comment Is there any difference between Cache.Insert("Key", "Value") and Cache["Key"] = "Value"?) for setting the defaults when adding items to the cache using the index methods. This is very basic.

public class CacheHandler
{
    /// <summary>
    /// static cache dependencies
    /// </summary>
    readonly static CacheDependency dependecies = null;
    /// <summary>
    /// sliding expiration
    /// </summary>
    readonly static TimeSpan slidingExpiration = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(5);

    /// <summary>
    /// absolute expiration
    /// </summary>
    readonly static DateTime absoluteExpiration = System.Web.Caching.Cache.NoAbsoluteExpiration;

    /// <summary>
    /// private singleton 
    /// </summary>
    static CacheHandler handler;

    /// <summary>
    /// gets the current cache handler
    /// </summary>
    public static CacheHandler Current { get { return handler ?? (handler = new CacheHandler()); } }

    /// <summary>
    /// private constructor
    /// </summary>
    private CacheHandler() { }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets \ Sets objects from the cache. Setting the object will use the default settings above
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key">the cache key</param>
    /// <returns>the object stored in the cache</returns>
    public object this[string key]
    {
        get
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current == null)
                throw new Exception("The current HTTP context is unavailable. Unable to read cached objects.");
            return HttpContext.Current.Cache[key];
        }
        set
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current == null)
                throw new Exception("The current HTTP context is unavailable. Unable to set the cache object.");
            HttpContext.Current.Cache.Insert(key, value, dependecies, absoluteExpiration , slidingExpiration);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// the current HTTP context
    /// </summary>
    public Cache Context
    {
        get
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current == null)
                throw new Exception("The current HTTP context is unavailable. Unable to retrive the cache context.");
            return HttpContext.Current.Cache;
        }
    }
}

Again this is super simple and basic but requires a call to another service to insert the cache something like.

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    CacheHandler.Current["abc"] = "123";
}

If you are just starting your application you could replace the Cache property of an ASP.Net page with your new cache handler such as.

public partial class BasePage : Page
{
    protected new CacheHandler Cache
    {
        get { return CacheHandler.Current; }
    }
}

Then all your pages can be changed to the following.

public partial class _Default : **BasePage**
{
}

And calling the cache handler is a simple as

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Cache["abc"] = "123";
}

Which will be your cache handler instead of the default Cache object.

These are just options and really up to you how you wish to handle your caching within your application and if this is really worth the effort.

Cheers.

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According to the documentation of the Cache.Item property, there is no difference:

REMARKS:

You can use this property to retrieve the value of a specified cache item, or to add an item and a key for it to the cache. Adding a cache item using the Item property is equivalent to calling the Cache.Insert method.

(emphasis is mine).

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I would assume that Cache.Insert will fail if the item already exists, while Cache[] will overwrite the existing item. –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 18 '13 at 1:59
3  
Cache.Insert wont fail if it is already in the cache context. According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9bawy15w.aspx Under Remarks states: This method will overwrite an existing cache item whose key matches the key parameter. –  Nico Sep 18 '13 at 2:01

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