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How can I loop through a List and grab each item?

I want the output to look like this:

Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", myMoney.amount, myMoney.type);

Here is my code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<Money> myMoney = new List<Money> {
        new Money{amount = 10, type="US"},
        new Money{amount = 20, type="US"}};
}

class Money
{
    public int amount { get; set; }
    public string type { get; set; }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 48 down vote accepted

foreach:

foreach (var money in myMoney) {
    Console.WriteLine("Amount is {0} and type is {1}", money.amount, money.type);
}

MSDN Link

Alternatively, because it is a List<T>.. which implements an indexer method [], you can use a normal for loop as well.. although its less readble (IMO):

for (var i = 0; i < myMoney.Count; i++) {
    Console.WriteLine("Amount is {0} and type is {1}", myMoney[i].amount, myMoney[i].type);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is important to note that the foreach loop has a little more overhead since it has to create a new object each iteration (also adds to the garbage collector). Depending on the size of the object and the context it may be better to use a simple for loop. – awudoin Sep 18 '13 at 4:25
4  
@awudoin What? No it doesn't.. it creates a reference on the stack.. other than that, it doesn't. A foreach doesn't clone the objects.. – Simon Whitehead Sep 18 '13 at 4:32
2  
@awudoin that's simply not true. Please don't spread false information. – Phill Sep 18 '13 at 4:33
1  
I should clarify: It also creates an Enumerator.. which is a struct.. which is also on the stack. So I still don't quite get what you were getting at with your comment. – Simon Whitehead Sep 18 '13 at 4:43
3  
You're right....it is just an Enumerator and not a copy of the object. But the fact remains, depending on what you're doing there is more overhead with a foreach loop vs. a for loop. I just ran a quick test with your code with 100,000 entries in the List and the foreach loop took twice as long (actually 1.9 times as long). This isn't necessarily true in all situations, but in many. It depends on the size of the List, how many operations you do within the loop, etc.... This was what I was getting at. – awudoin Sep 19 '13 at 3:35

Just like any other collection. With the addition of the List<T>.ForEach method.

foreach (var item in myMoney)
    Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", item.amount, item.type);

for (int i = 0; i < myMoney.Count; i++)
    Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", myMoney[i].amount, myMoney[i].type);

myMoney.ForEach(item => Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", item.amount, item.type));
share|improve this answer

Just for completeness, there is also the LINQ/Lambda way:

myMoney.ForEach((theMoney) => Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", theMoney.amount, theMoney.type));
share|improve this answer

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