Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

This is my posting model. Posts have many user_ids through postings. I'd like to return the Posts that have user_id 2 and 3. So posts with ID 7 and 8.

Ideally my code would look something like this... but it doesn't work

Post.joins(:postings).where("postings.user_id = ?", [2,3])

id  | post_id | user_id | created_at                | updated_at                |
+---+---------+--------+---------------------------+---------------------------+
| 1 | 7       | 1      | 2013-09-07 16:03:50 -0400 | 2013-09-07 16:03:50 -0400 |
| 2 | 7       | 2      | 2013-09-07 16:03:50 -0400 | 2013-09-07 16:03:50 -0400 |
| 3 | 7       | 3      | 2013-09-07 16:03:50 -0400 | 2013-09-07 16:03:50 -0400 |
| 4 | 8       | 2      | 2013-09-07 22:17:49 -0400 | 2013-09-07 22:17:49 -0400 |
| 5 | 8       | 3      | 2013-09-07 22:17:49 -0400 | 2013-09-07 22:17:49 -0400 |
| 6 | 8       | 6      | 2013-09-07 22:17:49 -0400 | 2013-09-07 22:17:49 -0400 |
| 7 | 12      | 3      | 2013-09-14 12:49:56 -0400 | 2013-09-14 12:49:56 -0400 |

ADDED COMMENTS

  • I am using Rails
  • I'd like to be able to keep the [2,3] dynamic so there can be 10 entries in the array or 2

  • the Post table does not have a user_id column. The Posting model has a user_id column and the User table has a id column. The relationship between the two has been setup using a has_many relationship.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I like to solve these problems using aggregation with logic in the having clause, because this is the most flexible approach to these types of questions:

select post_id
from postings
group by post_id
having sum(case when user_id = 2 then 1 else 0 end) > 0 and
       sum(case when user_id = 3 then 1 else 0 end) > 0;

Each condition in the having clause is counting the number of records that match each user id.

EDIT:

Depending on the indexes that you have on the tables, the following might actually perform better for this particular problem:

select p2.user_id
from postings p2 join
     postings p3
     on p2.post_id = p3.post_id and
        p2.user_id = 2 and
        p3.user_id = 3;

EDIT II:

For a dynamic list, you could do:

select post_id
from postings
where user_id in (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
group by post_id
having count(distinct user_id) = 5;
share|improve this answer
    
I used your later function without the "having count(distinct user_id = 5)" It does the same as Posting.where(:user_id => [2,3]) which returns 7,8,12.. this is incorrect. I would only like to see those that have user_id 2 as well as 3, not those that have 2 or 3. –  ebbflowgo Sep 18 '13 at 4:01
    
@ebbflowgo . . . That is why you need the having count(distinct) = # of elements. –  Gordon Linoff Sep 18 '13 at 4:03
    
beautiful, thank you! I now understand why you put a count of 5. –  ebbflowgo Sep 18 '13 at 4:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.