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Is it possible to hot reload external js files in node.js based on its timestamp?

I know node.js caches module after first time load from here: http://nodejs.org/docs/latest/api/modules.html#modules_caching

Modules are cached after the first time they are loaded. This means (among other things) that every call to require('foo') will get exactly the same object returned, if it would resolve to the same file.

And I also know if I need to reload it I can do like this:

// first time load
var foo = require('./foo');
foo.bar()

...

// in case need to reload
delete require.cache[require;.resolve('./foo')]
foo = require('./foo')
foo.bar();

But I wonder if there's any native support in node.js that it watches the file and reload it if there's any changes. Or I need to do it by myself?

pseudo code like

// during reload
if (timestamp for last loaded < file modified time)
    reload the file as above and return
else
    return cached required file

P.S. I am aware of supervisor and nodemon and don't want to restart server for reloading some specific modules.

share|improve this question
    
Are you actually loading modules? If not, you can always use fs.watch(). nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_watch_filename_options_listener If you are loading modules, you seem to have an edge use case. You really want inconsistent parts of code in your application? You can always eval(), but I think what you're doing now is better. – Brad Sep 18 '13 at 3:25
    
@Brad yes, I do really want this reloading feature. since some of the files are opt to be changed. And I need to make them active in time. yes, eval is an option, but not good as require. – Tony Chen Sep 18 '13 at 3:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is native support, although it isn't consistent across operating systems. That would be either using fs.watch(), or fs.watchFile(). The first function will use file change events, while the second one will use stat polling.

You can watch a file, and the check it's modification time when it has changed.

var fs = require('fs');
var file = './module.js';

var loadTime = new Date().getTime();
var module = require(file);

fs.watch(file, function(event, filename) {
  fs.stat(file, function(err, stats) {
    if (stats.mtime.getTime() > loadTime) {
      // delete the cached file and reload
    } else {
      // return the cached file
    }
  });
});

With fs.watchFile(), you don't need to use fs.stats() since the functions already callbacks instances of fs.Stat.

fs.watchFile(file, function(curr, prev) {
  if (curr.mtime.getTime() > loadTime) {
    // delete the cached file and reload
  } else {
    // return the cached file
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
polling adds overhead the server, so I think fs.watch() should be a better way. And I still need to maintain a list for tracking file last loaded time. Back to my question, I need to do a loop to require a series of js files. I was thinking to inject hot-reloading / timecheck code into the loop and require/clear cache if necessary. But given fs.watch function, how is that possible? – Tony Chen Sep 18 '13 at 4:09
    
It's worth note that this will not replace the logic already cached by the application itself. If using Express for example, reloading the file which contains the route doesn't mean Express will actually load the new code in the next request; so a truly working "hot code reload" algorithm would require an app wide solution to know when a file with path X should update the feature Y. – gustavohenke Sep 18 '13 at 4:40
    
Guess I need to development a smart file reload approach for my own use. Probably some edge case need to consider as well. Thanks. – Tony Chen Sep 18 '13 at 12:15

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