Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
>>> import math
>>> math.pi
3.141592653589793
>>> math.pi = 3
>>> math.pi
3
>>> import math
>>> math.pi
3

Initial question: Why can't I get math.pi back?

I thought import would import all the defined variables and functions to the current scope. And if a variable name already exists in current scope, then it would replace it.

Yes, it does replace it:

>>> pi = 3
>>> from math import *
>>> pi
3.141592653589793

Then I thought maybe the math.pi = 3 assignment actually changed the property in the math class(or is it math module?), which the import math imported.

I was right:

>>> import math
>>> math.pi
3.141592653589793
>>> math.pi = 3
>>> from math import *
>>> pi
3

So, it seems that:
If you do import x, then it imports x as a class-like thing. And if you make changes to x.property, the change would persist in the module so that every time you import it again, it's a modified version.

Real question:

  1. Why is import implemented this way? Why not let every import math import a fresh, unmodified copy of math? Why leave the imported math open to change?
  2. Is there any workaround to get math.pi back after doing math.pi = 3 (except math.pi = 3.141592653589793, of course)?
  3. Originally I thought import math is preferred over from math import *. But this behaviour leaves me worrying someone else might be modifying my imported module if I do it this way...How should I do the import?
share|improve this question
1  
You may find Nick Coghlan's Traps for the Unwary a good (related) read. –  kojiro Sep 18 '13 at 4:05
    
@kojiro Thanks for the link! –  octref Sep 18 '13 at 4:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A module may be imported many times. An import statement just loads the reference from sys.modules. If the import statement also reloaded the module from disk, it would be quite slow. Modifying a module like this is very unusual and is only done under rare, documented circumstances, so there’s no need to worry.

How to reload a module:

>>> import imp
>>> imp.reload(math)
<module 'math' (built-in)>
>>> math.pi
3.141592653589793
share|improve this answer
5  
imp.reload = lambda x: "Woops" –  scohe001 Sep 18 '13 at 3:58
    
@Josh reload(imp) –  DanielB Sep 18 '13 at 4:07
2  
please don't tell people to reload modules. you really shouldn't ever need to –  jterrace Sep 18 '13 at 4:08
1  
@jterrace: what about when you're debugging a module which you're changing between runs in ipython? –  Neil G Sep 18 '13 at 5:31
1  
@octref: reload() should really only be used in interactive shell when you're modifying the source code of a module while issuing commands. If it's a running program, then you really shouldn't be using reload(). Instead, you should find and remove the offending module, or find a way to control its monkey patching behavior. The problem with reload() is that you can end up with multiple copies of the same variables/classes/methods that all works differently, incompatibly, and this will lead to all sorts of nightmare. –  Lie Ryan Sep 18 '13 at 8:32

Python only creates one copy of any given module. Importing a module repeatedly reuses the original. This is because if modules A and B imported C and D, which imported E and F, etc., C and D would get loaded twice, and E and F would get loaded 4 times, etc. With any but the most trivial of dependency graphs, you'd spend a few minutes loading redundant modules before running out of memory. Also, if A imported B and B imported A, you'd get stuck in a recursive loop and, again, run out of memory without doing anything useful.

The solution: Don't screw with the contents of other modules. If you do, that's an interpreter-wide change. There are occasionally situations where you'd want to do this, so Python lets you, but it's usually a bad idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh I see how it works out... If I do a from math import * it doesn't leave a pointer to the module so that I can't modify the module...thanks! –  octref Sep 18 '13 at 4:22
    
I don't understand your concern, octref, from your comments and question it seems that you assume you do the import for other coders to use. –  justhalf Sep 18 '13 at 4:26
1  
@justhalf I'm asking this out of my curiosity... And, what else are all those access modifiers in OOP languages made for? –  octref Sep 18 '13 at 4:30
    
for Python, the OOP is only by convention. In Python there is no real access modifiers like in Java as some answers have highlighted. You can access every member of any module you imported, like you did. The convention is that the variables that should not be accessed from other module should be prepended with an underscore. So if you see a variable named _vocabulary in a module, that means the original writer doesn't want people to access that variable directly, but Python will still allow you to do that. –  justhalf Sep 18 '13 at 4:33
1  
@justhalf: neither is access modifier in Java actually enforced at the bytecode level; even with Java, reflection can be used to muck with private members. –  Lie Ryan Sep 18 '13 at 8:21

The import behavior is intended to allow modules to have state. For example, a module that runs initialization code may have all sorts of different behaviors based on what happens at init time (a good example is the os module, which transparently loads different versions of the path submodule depending on what OS you're on). The usual behavior exists to allow lots of different code to access the module without re-running the initialization over and over. Moreover, modules function sort of like static classes in other languages - they can maintain state and are often used as an alternative to global variables: eg, you might use the locale module to set local culture variables (currency format, etc) -- calling locale.setlocale in one part of your code and local.getlocale in another is a nice alternative to making a global variable.

Your example, of course, points out the weakness. One of the classic python principes is

We're all adults here

The language does not provide much of the privacy management features you'd find in, say, Java or C# which let the author lock down the contents of a module or class. You can, if you're feeling malicious (or just suicidal) do exactly the sort of thing done in your example: change pi to equal 3, or turn a function into a variable, or all sorts of other nasty stuff. The language is not designed to make that hard -- it's up to coders to be responsible.

@Josh Lee's answer shows how to use reload, which is the correct way of refreshing a module to it's disk-based state. The wisdom of using reload depends mostly on how much init code is in the module, and also on the web of other modules which import or are imported by the module in question.

share|improve this answer
    
Well that's one of the reason I like Python over Java. I guess maybe the point of Java's access modifiers lies more in team working on the same projects (so that you force your teammates to follow your API, not messing up with your implementation...) –  octref Sep 18 '13 at 4:13
1  
absolutely - the whole access thing is designed for people working in the bowels of huge projects or corporations who will never meet or even hear of people using their stuff.... –  theodox Sep 18 '13 at 16:18

I'm not sure I can answer all of your questions, but let's give it a try.

1 - Python doesn't have scopes, for example, private, protected, etc..., so it gives you freedom to actually change what you want, including variables from modules you imported. That's how Python is and there are workarounds, but I don't know if you'd be actually interested.

2 - To get math.pi back, as posted on an answer here is reload(module), so, reload(math).

3 - I'm now exactly sure what your concern is here. Your module will not change (just as the original math.pi does not change after you reload it) since when you import it, it only references to your sys.modules.

This answer may be more complete together with Josh Lee's answer.

share|improve this answer
4  
Sorry for nitpicking, but Python does have scope. –  octref Sep 18 '13 at 4:08
    
hey, we have the same answer! haha –  justhalf Sep 18 '13 at 4:09
    
if you consider this: docs.python.org/release/1.5.1p1/tut/scopes.html Well yes, but i should say, coming from C/C++/Java python scopes are somewhat different. I guess i should have specified that python doesn't have scopes like C++ or Java. haha and justhalf. yep appearently when you posted it 3 minutes before i did and i didn't see it... sorry –  Ronnie Andrew Sep 18 '13 at 4:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.