Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Support we have an n * m table, and two players play this game. They rule out cells in turn. A player can choose a cell (i, j) and rule out all the cells from (i,j) to (n, m), and who rules out the last cell loses the game.

For example, on a 3*5 board, player 1 rules out cell (3,3) to (3,5), and player 2 rules out (2,5) to (3,5), current board is like this: (O means the cell is not ruled out while x mean it is ruled out)

3 O O x x x
2 O O O O x
1 O O O O O
  1 2 3 4 5

and after player 1 rules out cells from (2,1) to (3,5), the board becomes

3 x x x x x
2 x x x x x
1 O O O O O
  1 2 3 4 5

Now player 2 rules out cells from (1,2) to (3,5), which leaves only (1,1) clean:

3 x x x x x
2 x x x x x
1 O x x x x
  1 2 3 4 5

So player 1 has to rules out the only (1,1) cell, since one player has to rule out at least one cell in a turn, and he loses the game.

It is clearly that in n*n, 1*n, and 2*n (n >= 2) cases, the one who plays the first wins.

My problem is that, is there any strategy for a player to win the game in all cases? Should he plays first?

P.S

I think it is related to strategies like dynamic programming or divide-and-conquer, but has not come to an idea yet. So I post it here.

The answer

Thanks to sdcwc's link. For tables bigger than 1*1, the first player will win. The proof is follow: (borrowed from the wiki page)

It turns out that for any rectangular starting position bigger than 1 × 1 the 1st player can win. This can be shown using a strategy-stealing argument: assume that the 2nd player has a winning strategy against any initial 1st player move. Suppose then, that the 1st player takes only the bottom right hand square. By our assumption, the 2nd player has a response to this which will force victory. But if such a winning response exists, the 1st player could have played it as his first move and thus forced victory. The 2nd player therefore cannot have a winning strategy.

And Zermelo's theorem ensures the existence of such a winning strategy.

share|improve this question
1  
although an interesting mental exercise, it seems more than a stretch to call this programming-related. at least as written. –  goldPseudo Dec 11 '09 at 8:44
1  
A two-dimensional Nim? Interesting. –  Jeffrey Hantin Dec 11 '09 at 8:53
2  
See also: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chomp –  sdcvvc Dec 11 '09 at 9:21
2  
you should put it as an answer –  jk. Dec 11 '09 at 9:38
1  
@Zellux You should add the information from Zermelos Theorem to the proof as well –  Andreas Brinck Dec 11 '09 at 9:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This game is known as Chomp. The first player wins, see the link for his strategy (nonconstructive).

share|improve this answer

Here's a Python program that will win for boards larger than 1x1 if allowed to go first (but it's pretty slow for boards larger than 10x10):

class State(object):
    """A state is a set of spaces that haven't yet been ruled out.
    Spaces are pairs of integers (x, y) where x and y >= 1."""

    # Only winnable states in this dictionary:
    _next_moves = {}
    # States where any play allows opponent to force a victory:
    _lose_states = set()

    def __init__(self, spaces):
        self._spaces = frozenset(spaces)

    @classmethod
    def create_board(cls, x, y):
        """Create a state with all spaces for the given board size."""
        return State([(r+1, c+1) for r in xrange(x) for c in xrange(y)])

    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self._spaces == other._spaces

    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(self._spaces)

    def play(self, move):
        """Returns a new state where the given move has been played."""
        if move not in self._spaces:
            raise ValueError('invalid move')
        new_spaces = set()
        for s in self._spaces:
            if s[0] < move[0] or s[1] < move[1]:
                new_spaces.add(s)
        return State(new_spaces)

    def winning_move(self):
        """If this state is winnable, return a move that guarantees victory."""
        if self.is_winnable() and not self.is_empty():
            return State._next_moves[self]
        return None

    def random_move(self):
        import random
        candidates = [m for m in self._spaces if m[0] > 1 and m[1] > 1]
        if candidates: return random.choice(candidates)
        candidates = [m for m in self._spaces if m[0] > 1 or m[1] > 1]
        if candidates: return random.choice(candidates)
        return (1,1)

    def minimal_move(self):
        """Return a move that removes as few pieces as possible."""
        return max(self._spaces, key=lambda s:len(self.play(s)._spaces))

    def is_winnable(self):
        """Return True if the current player can force a victory"""
        if not self._spaces or self in State._next_moves:
            return True
        if self in State._lose_states:
            return False

        # Try the moves that remove the most spaces from the board first
        plays = [(move, self.play(move)) for move in self._spaces]
        plays.sort(key=lambda play:len(play[1]._spaces))
        for move, result in plays:
            if not result.is_winnable():
                State._next_moves[self] = move
                return True
        # No moves can guarantee victory
        State._lose_states.add(self)
        return False

    def is_empty(self):
        return not self._spaces

    def draw_board(self, rows, cols):
        string = []
        for r in xrange(rows, 0, -1):
            row = ['.'] * cols
            for c in xrange(cols):
                if (r, c+1) in self._spaces:
                    row[c] = 'o'
            string.append(('%2d ' % r) + ' '.join(row))
        string.append('  ' + ''.join(('%2d' % c) for c in xrange(1, cols+1)))
        return '\n'.join(string)

    def __str__(self):
        if not self._spaces: return '.'
        rows = max(s[0] for s in self._spaces)
        cols = max(s[1] for s in self._spaces)
        return self.draw_board(rows, cols)

    def __repr__(self):
        return 'State(%r)' % sorted(self._spaces)

def run_game(x, y):
    turn = 1
    state = State.create_board(x, y)
    while True:
        if state.is_empty():
            print 'Player %s wins!' % turn
            return
        if state.is_winnable():
            move = state.winning_move()
        else:
            move = state.random_move()
        state = state.play(move)
        print 'Player %s plays %s:' % (turn, move)
        print state.draw_board(x, y)
        print
        turn = 3 - turn

def challenge_computer(x, y):
    state = State.create_board(x, y)
    print "Your turn:"
    print state.draw_board(x, y)
    while True:
        # Get valid user input
        while True:
            try:
                move = input('Enter move: ')
                if not (isinstance(move, tuple) and len(move) == 2):
                    raise SyntaxError
                state = state.play(move)
                break
            except SyntaxError, NameError:
                print 'Enter a pair of integers, for example: 1, 1'
            except ValueError:
                print 'Invalid move!'
            except (EOFError, KeyboardInterrupt):
                return
        print state.draw_board(x, y)
        if state.is_empty():
            print 'Computer wins!'
            return
        if state.is_winnable():
            move = state.winning_move()
        else:
            move = state.minimal_move()
        state = state.play(move)
        print
        print 'Computer plays %s:' % (move,)
        print state.draw_board(x, y)
        print
        if state.is_empty():
            print 'You win!'
            return

if __name__ == '__main__':
    challenge_computer(8, 9)

And the output from a sample run:

$ python -c 'import game; game.run_game(8, 9)'
Player 1 plays (6, 7):
 8 o o o o o o . . .
 7 o o o o o o . . .
 6 o o o o o o . . .
 5 o o o o o o o o o
 4 o o o o o o o o o
 3 o o o o o o o o o
 2 o o o o o o o o o
 1 o o o o o o o o o
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 2 plays (4, 8):
 8 o o o o o o . . .
 7 o o o o o o . . .
 6 o o o o o o . . .
 5 o o o o o o o . .
 4 o o o o o o o . .
 3 o o o o o o o o o
 2 o o o o o o o o o
 1 o o o o o o o o o
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 1 plays (5, 1):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 o o o o o o o . .
 3 o o o o o o o o o
 2 o o o o o o o o o
 1 o o o o o o o o o
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 2 plays (3, 7):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 o o o o o o . . .
 3 o o o o o o . . .
 2 o o o o o o o o o
 1 o o o o o o o o o
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 1 plays (4, 1):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 . . . . . . . . .
 3 o o o o o o . . .
 2 o o o o o o o o o
 1 o o o o o o o o o
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 2 plays (2, 3):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 . . . . . . . . .
 3 o o . . . . . . .
 2 o o . . . . . . .
 1 o o o o o o o o o
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 1 plays (1, 5):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 . . . . . . . . .
 3 o o . . . . . . .
 2 o o . . . . . . .
 1 o o o o . . . . .
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 2 plays (2, 2):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 . . . . . . . . .
 3 o . . . . . . . .
 2 o . . . . . . . .
 1 o o o o . . . . .
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 1 plays (1, 4):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 . . . . . . . . .
 3 o . . . . . . . .
 2 o . . . . . . . .
 1 o o o . . . . . .
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 2 plays (2, 1):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 . . . . . . . . .
 3 . . . . . . . . .
 2 . . . . . . . . .
 1 o o o . . . . . .
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 1 plays (1, 2):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 . . . . . . . . .
 3 . . . . . . . . .
 2 . . . . . . . . .
 1 o . . . . . . . .
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 2 plays (1, 1):
 8 . . . . . . . . .
 7 . . . . . . . . .
 6 . . . . . . . . .
 5 . . . . . . . . .
 4 . . . . . . . . .
 3 . . . . . . . . .
 2 . . . . . . . . .
 1 . . . . . . . . .
   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Player 1 wins!
share|improve this answer

A thing that comes to mind: if the board is 2x2, the first player loses: in fact, from this board:

O O 
O O

there are two variations (a and b):

a.1)

1 1
O O

a.2) first player loses

1 1
O 2

or, b.1)

1 O
O O

b.2) first player loses

1 2
O 2

at this point the strategy boils down to forcing the board to become 2x2 squared; then, the first that enters that board will lose it. This will lead you to the second step of your strategy, mainly:

how to make sure you're not the one entering such configuration?

or,

how many configurations are there that will lead me to obtain such a configuration, starting from a larger one? For example, starting from a 3x3 board:

O O O
O O O
O O O

there are several strategies, depending on who starts first and how many are nullified; I suggest, at this point, using a genetic algorithm to explore the best solution (it's fun! believe me) :)

share|improve this answer
    
you seem to have numbered your board differently to the question? b.1 looks like an illegal move? –  jk. Dec 11 '09 at 9:28
    
@jk: oh my, you're right. I went on assuming you could only take out lines or rows, never a squared area. Whops. –  lorenzog Dec 11 '09 at 9:50

This is similar to a game often played with matches (can't recall the name)

Anyway I think it depends on the shape of the board who wins. 2*2 is trivially a lose for the second player and 2 * N is trivially a lose for the first by reducing the board to 2*2 and forcing the other player to play. I think all square boards are second player wins while rectangular are first player wins, but not proved it yet

Edit:

Ok I think it is for a square board p1 always chooses 2,2 then balances the row and column ensuring p2 loses

as with sdcwc's comment rectangluar boards are also a first player win. only the degenerate board 1 * 1 is a 2nd player win

share|improve this answer
1  
Why 2*2 is a win for the second player? The first player takes (2,2) and then the second player will lose. –  ZelluX Dec 11 '09 at 9:13
    
yes think i reveresed the winning condition there- edited –  jk. Dec 11 '09 at 9:20
    
Actually 2*N is a win for the first player by playing (2,N). The second player cannot avoid the first player for always making the pair of columns such that the first is exactly 1 more than the second. That means the second player will eventually be stuck with the final piece in the final column. –  Paul Hsieh Dec 19 '09 at 22:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.