Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a abstract base class that implements properties from an interface:

public abstract class AbstractItem : IPropertyListOwner
{
    public ObservableCollection<IProperty> Properties { get; }
}

My concrete class now also needs to implement concrete properties:

public class ConcreteItem : AbstractItem
{
    public ObservableCollection<ConcreteProperty> Properties { get; }
}

How do I achieve that? Right now I see the following approaches:

  1. Simply use a separate property, don't use that from base class
public class ConcreteItem : AbstractItem
{
    public ObservableCollection<ConcreteProperty> ConcreteProperties { get; }
}
  1. Return a new filtered ObservableCollection
public class ConcreteItem : AbstractItem
{
    public ObservableCollection<ConcreteProperty> ConcreteProperties
    {
        get { return new ObservableCollection<ConcreteProperty>(base.Properties.OfType<ConcreteProperty>()); }
    }
}

What would you do? Any better approaches?

share|improve this question
    
If your concrete class inherits from an abstract class that already contains the properties, why do you need to override it again in the concrete class? –  Omribitan Sep 18 '13 at 7:53
    
I have multiple concrete classes that might use different implementations of IProperty. Sorry for not beeing clear! –  mamuesstack Sep 18 '13 at 8:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Generics will help you:

interface IPropertyListOwner<T>
  where T : IProperty
{
    ObservableCollection<T> Properties { get; }
}

abstract class AbstractItem<T> : IPropertyListOwner<T>
  where T : IProperty
{
    public abstract ObservableCollection<T> Properties { get; }
}

class ConcreteProperty : IProperty { }

class ConcreteItem : AbstractItem<ConcreteProperty>
{
    public override ObservableCollection<ConcreteProperty> Properties 
    { 
        get
        {
            // ...
        }
    }
}

But this will be inconvenient, if you're planning to work somewhere with IPropertyListOwner.

Suppose, you have some code, that should work only with IProperty. For example, let this code display names of properties:

interface IProperty
{
    string Name { get; }
}

In the case of generics, you can't write foreach, that will iterate through collection of properties, without knowing T at runtime:

void WritePropertyNames<T>(IPropertyListOwner<T> owner)
{
    foreach (var property in owner.Properties)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(property.Name);
    }
}

In other words, to do something with generic IPropertyListOwner<T> you will need code with generics too.

If you'll post use cases, than it will help to post more clear answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Simple question from coding practices, Is it OK to use generics in interfaces? –  Faisal Hafeez Sep 18 '13 at 8:02
    
Of course it's OK. Why this shouldn't be OK? :) FCL contains many generic interfaces. –  Dennis Sep 18 '13 at 8:05
    
Do you need an AbstractItem Class here since I see it is being overriden by the ConcreteItem? More over there is no virtual or overriding defined. Am I missing something? –  CarbineCoder Sep 18 '13 at 8:32
    
@Bharath: you're right about virtual/overriding, it's a typo. About AbstractItem - may be OP has any additional payload in his real code. –  Dennis Sep 18 '13 at 8:39
    
Thanks for Clarifying Dennis –  CarbineCoder Sep 18 '13 at 8:58
public abstract class AbstractItem<T> : IPropertyListOwner where T:IProperty
{
    public ObservableCollection<T> Properties { get; private set; }
}

public class ConcreteItem : AbstractItem<ConcreteProperty>
{

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.