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I have a generic class, says :

MyClass<T>

Inside a method of this class, I would like to test the type of T, for example :

void MyMethod()
{

    if (T == String)
        ...
    if (T == int)
        ...
}

how can I do that ?

Thanks for your help

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2  
As an aside, why would you want to do this ? –  Steve De Caux Dec 11 '09 at 8:50

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't, normally, due to type erasure. See Angelika Langer's Java Generics FAQ for more details.

What you can do is pass a Class<T> into your constructor, and then check that:

public MyClass<T>
{
    private final Class<T> clazz;

    public MyClass(Class<T> clazz)
    {
        this.clazz = clazz;
    }

    public void myMethod()
    {
        if (clazz == String.class)
        {
           ...
        }
    }
}

Note that Java does not allow primitives to be used for type arguments though, so int is out...

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Ew. Java is gross for this kind of thing. –  Conrad Meyer Dec 11 '09 at 8:50
4  
which honestly you shouldn't need if you design your classes properly. –  Bozho Dec 11 '09 at 9:02
    
I understand, maybe my desing is bad. I have a view that can be applyed to 2 models, except for some little things depending on the type of the object model. I don't want to create 2 views that are quite the same, but they are not working exactly the same. –  Tim Dec 11 '09 at 9:19
    
Tim: Some kind of inheritance or composition is the usual solution... –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 11 '09 at 11:12
    
(Or even a flag.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 11 '09 at 11:13

Because of type erasure you can't... mostly. But there is one exception to that. Consider:

class A {
  List<String> list;
}

public class Main {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    for (Field field : A.class.getDeclaredFields()) {
      System.out.printf("%s: %s%n", field.getName(), field.getGenericType());
    }
  }
}

Output:

list: java.util.List<java.lang.String>

If you need the class object, this is how you generally handle it:

public <T> T createObject(Class<T> clazz) {  
  return clazz.newInstance();
}

ie by passing the class object around and deriving the generic type from that class.

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if (object instanceof String)
   System.out.println("object is a string");
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2  
I think that's actually a reasonable point given the question. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 11 '09 at 11:14

As it was already stated you can get only generics-related information available at the static byte code level.

It's possible to resolve type arguments values and check if one type may be used in place of another then.

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if you have subclass B extends A that should match, too, the approach clazz == A.class. Doesn't work. You should then use A.class.isInstance(b) where b is an object of type B.

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If you want to do different things for different types would it still be generic?

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1  
good point of view –  Tim Dec 11 '09 at 13:29

Additionally to cletus one exception I've mine: super type tokens. The super type token will preserve the type information.

new Type<Set<Integer>>() {}

The type information can be retrieved with Class.getGenericSuperClass.

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