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I have a data.table that has factor column with empty levels. I need to get the row count and sums of other variables, all grouped by multiple factors, including the one with empty levels. My question is similar to this one, but here I need to count for multiple factors.

For example, let data.table be:

library('data.table')

dtr <- data.table(v1=sample(1:15), 
v2=factor(sample(letters[1:3], 15, replace = TRUE),levels=letters[1:5]),
v3=sample(c("yes", "no"), 15, replace = TRUE))

I want to do the following:

dtr[,list(freq=.N,mm=sum(v1,na.rm=T)),by=list(v2,v3)]

#Output is:
   v2  v3 freq mm
1:  b yes    4 22
2:  b  no    1 13
3:  c  no    3 10
4:  a  no    4 49
5:  c yes    1 10
6:  a yes    2 16

I want output include empty levels for v2 as well ("d" and "e"), like in table(dtr$v2,dtr$v3), so the final output should look like (the order doesn't matter):

   v2  v3 freq mm
1:  b yes    4 22
2:  b  no    1 13
3:  c  no    3 10
4:  a  no    4 49
5:  c yes    1 10
6:  a yes    2 16
7:  d yes    0 0
8:  d no    0 0
9:  e yes    0 0
10:  e no    0 0

I tried to use the method used in the link, but I'm not sure how to use joint J() function when there are multiple columns used.

This works fine for groupping by 1 column only:

setkey(dtr,v2)
dtr[J(levels(v2)),list(freq=.N,mm=sum(v1,na.rm=T))]

However, dtr[J(levels(v2),v3),list(freq=.N,mm=sum(v1,na.rm=T))] doesn't include all combinations

share|improve this question
    
I found that if I change the order of values and set setkey(dtr,v3,v2) and unique(dtr[J(v3,levels(v2)),list(freq=.N,mm=sum(v1,na.rm=T))]) will work, but could anyone please explain why and will it work for the big data.table with more than 2 groups? –  Asayat Sep 18 '13 at 8:17
3  
Thanks @Asayat. I've filed in a FR #4914 here: r-forge.r-project.org/tracker/… –  Arun Sep 18 '13 at 8:35
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted
library(data.table)
set.seed(42)
dtr <- data.table(v1=sample(1:15), 
                  v2=factor(sample(letters[1:3], 15, replace = TRUE),levels=letters[1:5]),
                  v3=sample(c("yes", "no"), 15, replace = TRUE))

res <- dtr[,list(freq=.N,mm=sum(v1,na.rm=T)),by=list(v2,v3)]

You can use CJ (a cross join). Doing this after aggregation avoids setting the key for the big table and should be faster.

setkeyv(res,c("v2","v3"))
res[CJ(levels(dtr[,v2]),unique(dtr[,v3])),]

#    v2  v3 freq mm
# 1:  a  no    1  9
# 2:  a yes    2 11
# 3:  b  no    2 11
# 4:  b yes    3 23
# 5:  c  no    4 40
# 6:  c yes    3 26
# 7:  d  no   NA NA
# 8:  d yes   NA NA
# 9:  e  no   NA NA
# 10:  e yes   NA NA
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! –  Asayat Sep 18 '13 at 8:22
    
Nice, but do you think this should be taken care of directly, like for example tapply? –  Arun Sep 18 '13 at 8:29
    
with >5*10^6 rows and > 300 factor levels tapply will run forever :) –  Asayat Sep 18 '13 at 8:32
2  
@Arun It would make sense from the statistical point of view to handle empty factor levels like this. –  Roland Sep 18 '13 at 8:33
1  
@Asayat No, Arun is talking about improving data.table to handle factors like tapply does. –  Roland Sep 18 '13 at 8:35
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