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Just a sample code:

template <class T> class TempBase
{
protected:
  string m_str;
};

template <class T> class Temp: public TempBase<T>
{
public:
  void method()
  {
    string
        &s = TempBase<T>::m_str //reference works fine
        /*NOTE compile failed:
        error: ‘std::string TempBase<int>::m_str’ is protected
        error: within this context
        error: cannot convert ‘std::string TempBase<int>::* {aka std::basic_string<char> TempBase<int>::*}’ to ‘std::string* {aka std::basic_string<char>*}’ in initialization
        */
      , *ps = &TempBase<T>::m_str 
      , *ps2 = &m_str //compile failed, obviously: ‘m_str’ was not declared in this scope
      , *ps3 = &s //this is workaround, works fine
    ;
  }
};

void f()
{
  Temp<int> t;
  t.method();
}

Goal: init pointer of type std::string * with ancestor member TempBase<T>::m_str.

Problem: correct syntax unknown

Comments: previous code contains 2 intentional compile errors:

  1. attempt to convert member pointer to data pointer
  2. templated ancestry members must be fully qualified

and 1 workaround.

Question: what is a correct syntax in this case to obtain pointer to ancestor data?

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2  
&this->m_str (dependent name lookup). &TempBase<T>::m_str tries to create a pointer-to-member, which isn't allowed here because of the access specifier, however you could use &this->TempBase<T>::m_str (but it's redundant) –  dyp Sep 18 '13 at 9:02
    
YES I forget a magic word this. It works, thanks! –  dyomas Sep 18 '13 at 9:40

2 Answers 2

I'm going to assume that the behaviour you want is best described by the workaround

&s = TempBase<T>::m_str;

(which you provide in the question) and not by the workaround

&s = this->m_str;

which would work too in your example.

Solution: &(TempBase::m_str)

Reason: TempBase::m_str is a qualified-id, (TempBase::m_str) is not.

Code example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

template <class T> class TempBase
{
protected:
  string m_str;
};

template <class T> class Temp: public TempBase<T>
{
public:
  void method()
  {
    string* ps3 = &(TempBase<T>::m_str); //this is workaround, works fine
    (*ps3) += "ciao";
    cout << *ps3 << endl;
  }
};

void f()
{
  Temp<int> t;
  t.method();
}

int main( int argc, char* argv[] ) 
{
    f();

}

which you can try here

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NO My compiler is g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5) 4.6.3. It behaves exactly the same in your example and in my one. And I tried to brace member before asking too... –  dyomas Sep 18 '13 at 9:34
    
tried with g++ (Ubuntu 4.8.1-2ubuntu1~12.04) 4.8.1 –  Stefano Falasca Sep 18 '13 at 9:40
    
and with visual studio 2003 –  Stefano Falasca Sep 18 '13 at 9:42
1  
The paranthesized expression (TempBase<T>::m_str) is not a qualified-id and therefore &(TempBase<T>::m_str) doesn't form a pointer-to-member, but an ordinary pointer to the object denoted by (TempBase<T>::m_str). Ergo: it is correct and should work. –  dyp Sep 18 '13 at 9:44
1  
(However, it has slightly different semantics than this->m_str or m_str in the case of a non-dependent name) –  dyp Sep 18 '13 at 9:45

The reason why &m_str doesn't work: [temp.dep]/3

In the definition of a class or class template, if a base class depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during unqualified name lookup [...]

However, this->m_str denotes a dependent name (because this is dependent per [temp.dep.expr]/2). In this case, dependent name lookup is used, which finds the base class member.

The problem is more obvious if we add a specialization of the template and a name outside the class scope:

string m_str;

template<class T> struct A { string m_str; };
template<> struct A<int> { /* no member */ };

template<class T> struct B : A
{
    void foo() { m_str = "hello"; }
};

B<int>().foo();    // clearly modifies the global `m_str`
B<double>().foo(); // modifies what?

If the base class scope was searched, it would not be known before the instantiation (before the template argument is known) what m_str refers to. Also, this could easily lead to unexpected results.

Therefore, base class scope is not searched (if the base class is dependent and if we're in a "template context").


The reason why &s = TempBase<T>::m_str works:

The id-expression TempBase<T>::m_str is using a qualified-id, therefore the scope of TempBase<T> is searched and the member m_str is found.

By the way: You could use just TempBase::m_str as well (using the injected-class-name).


The reason why &TempBase<T>::m_str doesn't work, but &(TempBase<T>::m_str) does: [expr.unary.op]/3

The result of the unary & operator is a pointer to its operand. The operand shall be an lvalue or a qualified-id. If the operand is a qualified-id naming a non-static member m of some class C with type T, the result has type “pointer to member of class C of type T” and is a prvalue designating C::m. Otherwise, if the type of the expression is T, the result has type “pointer to T” and is a prvalue that is the address of the designated object (1.7) or a pointer to the designated function.

The paranthesized expression (TempBase<T>::m_str) is not a qualified-id and therefore &(TempBase<T>::m_str) doesn't form a pointer-to-member, but an ordinary pointer to the object denoted by (TempBase<T>::m_str).

share|improve this answer
    
About &(TempBase<T>::m_str). You are clear and exhaustive, thanks. But my compiler ignores parentheses. Compiler is g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5) 4.6.3 –  dyomas Sep 18 '13 at 10:19
    
@dyomas That must be a compiler bug, fixed, unfortunately I cannot find it currently in the bugzilla database. Tried with 4.6.4 and got the same error (it thinks it's a pointer-to-member). Same code with 4.8.1 (both using -std=c++03) works fine. –  dyp Sep 18 '13 at 10:37

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