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Say I have a worker thread tWorker, which is initialized when Boss is constructed and tells it to do work(), until bRetired is true. An std::mutex, mtx, locks some data (vFiles) so that tWorker owns it when he's working on it.

How do I make tWorker "commit suicide" once bRetired becomes true? How would the mutex be destroyed when the thread stops execution?

I've read that std::thread objects cannot be interrupted in any way. Does letting the thread do nothing (or calling std::this_thread::yield()) provide the same effect as killing the thread?

class Boss {
private:
    std::thread tWorker;
    std::mutex mtx;
    bool bRetired;
    std::vector< std::string > vFiles;

    void work() {
        while ( bRetired == false ) {
            // Do your job!
            mtx.lock();
            // ... Do something about vFiles ...
            mtx.unlock();
        }

        // tWorker has retired, commit suicide
        // ** How? **

        // Does this suffice if I want to "kill" the thread?
        std::this_thread::yield(); 
    }

public:
    Boss() {
        bRetired = false;
        tWorker = std::thread( &Boss::work, this );

        // Have worker do its job independently
        // **Bonus Question** : Should this be tWorker.join() or tWorker.detach()?
        tWorker.detach();
    }

    retire() {
        bRetired = true;
    }
}

Notes

  • The worker thread cannot be started again once it is retired.
  • The worker thread works on the background without interrupting the main thread's execution.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The call to std::thread::yield() is unrequired and does not kill the calling thread:

Provides a hint to the implementation to reschedule the execution of threads, allowing other threads to run.

Just exit the function to exit the thread.

Note that the use of bRetired is incorrect as two threads can be accessing the same memory location and one of those threads is modifying it: this is undefined behaviour. Also, the change made in the function retire(), a different thread, will not be seen by the thread executing run(): use atomic<bool> for atomicity and visibility.

If join() was used within the constructor the constructor would not return until the thread exited, which would never happen as it would be impossible to call retire() because the object would not be available (as the constructor would not have returned). If it is required to synchronize with the exiting of the thread then do not detach() but join() in the retire() function:

void retire() {
    bRetired = true;
    tWorker.join();
}

Use RAII for acquiring mutexes (std::lock_guard for example) to ensure it always released. The mutex will be destroyed when it goes out of scope, in this case when its containing class is destructed.

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So, breaking from the while loop will stop the thread? Say I added another bool which is bSleep to make the thread sleep or do nothing until I tell it to (not with a specific amount of time), should I return from the function or use yield()? –  alxcyl Sep 18 '13 at 9:29
3  
@LanceGray, see condition_variable for implementing a wait until I tell you to do something mechanism. –  hmjd Sep 18 '13 at 9:30
    
If I understood it correctly, std::condition_variable is similar to pthread_cond_wait. Is that right? –  alxcyl Sep 18 '13 at 9:35
    
Yes, depending on your OS the implementation may use something like this internally. –  Hulk Sep 18 '13 at 9:58

How do I make tWorker "commit suicide" once bRetired becomes true?

You let the control flow exit the thread function. That std::this_thread::yield() call in unnecessary.

How would the mutex be destroyed when the thread stops execution?

That mutex is a member of Boss class. It gets destroyed in the destructor of Boss when the object is getting destroyed.

I've read that std::thread objects cannot be interrupted in any way.

C++ API does not provide means to terminate an arbitrary thread. There has to be a way to tell a thread to terminate and then wait till it does, as you intend to do.

Does letting the thread do nothing (or calling std::this_thread::yield()) provide the same effect as killing the thread?

No.

There is a race condition on bRetired variable though. It either needs to be std::atomic<bool> or it should only be read and modified only when that mutex is locked.

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