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There is a lot of websites like www.9gag.com that their website checks your scroll and identify if your scroll is about 80% down, if so, it displays more content.

Example of code that I would like to see:

$(window).scroll(function ()
{
    if(scroll.height >= 80%)
    {
        // the scroll is about 80% down.
    }

});

I would like to know how can i check if the scroll is about 80% down like those websites.

Thanks in advance, Daniel. :)

share|improve this question
    
You wouldn't want to test for a percentage if you want to continuously expand the page. The part of the page that has not been seen when loading more content would become bigger and bigger. Instead use a constant. –  Niels Abildgaard Sep 18 '13 at 11:44

5 Answers 5

You check what is height of the page, and compare this value to current position. If current position is 80% of the heigh than you run some code.

$(window).scroll(function ()
{
    var content_height = $(document).height();
    var content_scroll_pos = $(window).scrollTop();
    var percentage_value = content_scroll_pos * 100 / content_height;

    if(percentage_value >= 80)
    {
        console.dir("the scroll is about 80% down.");
    }
});

Didn't test it, but should do what you want :)

thanks to Alvaro for adding my code to fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/2wSSS/7/

share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't be getting the window height in every scroll event. Not ideal because is gonna be the same :) –  Alvaro Sep 18 '13 at 9:25
1  
@Alvaro think better. he wants to create infinite scroll. so window height will change. –  salivan Sep 18 '13 at 9:39
    
True, you are right. My apologies :) –  Alvaro Sep 18 '13 at 9:44
    
window height wont change though. window height is the height of the browser window not the content –  DGS Sep 18 '13 at 9:44
    
@DGS true that. –  salivan Sep 18 '13 at 9:52
$( document ).ready( function() {
    $( window ).bind( 'scroll', function( event ) {
        var win = $( this ),
            doc = $( document ),
            winH = win.height(),
            winT = win.scrollTop(),
            docH = doc.height(),
            interval = parseInt( winH * 0.2, 10 );

        if( docH - winH - winT < interval ) {
            console.log( 'the scroll is about 80% down' );
        }

    });
});
share|improve this answer

This is what you have to do:

//when scrolling...
$(window).scroll(function() {
    var windowsHeight = $(document).height() - $(window).height();
    var currentScroll = $(window).scrollTop();

    //if I scroll more than 80%
    if( ((currentScroll *100) / windowsHeight) > 80){
         //do whatever
   }
});

Living example: http://jsfiddle.net/2wSSS/6/

share|improve this answer
    
This does not take into account the document length at all. –  DGS Sep 18 '13 at 9:37
    
@DGS what about the $(window).height()? –  Alvaro Sep 18 '13 at 9:45
    
that is not related to the document length just the viewport height. –  DGS Sep 18 '13 at 9:46
    
@DGS Yeah, you are right. My fault! Updated. –  Alvaro Sep 18 '13 at 9:49
    
still doesnt work as intended since you havent included the windows height in the equation. It would currently require the top of the page to be below 80% –  DGS Sep 18 '13 at 9:51

Since there hasn't been a chosen answer, here's what I use to detect how far from the bottom in pixels, rather than percentage:

if($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() > $(document).height() - 300) { });
share|improve this answer

Try

$(window).scroll(function () {

    if (($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height()) > 0.8 * $(document).height()) {
        $('body').append("<div>Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.</div><div>Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.</div>")
    }
})

Fiddle

Has an example of dynamic content being added when page is scrolled below 80%

share|improve this answer
    
That's not 80%, but 80 pixels from the bottom. –  Alvaro Sep 18 '13 at 9:28
    
Adjusted to 80% –  DGS Sep 18 '13 at 9:32
    
Your fiddle is not working on Chrome at least. –  Alvaro Sep 18 '13 at 9:51
    
It is working for me on chrome. When you scroll below 80% extra divs get added to the content. You should be able to infinitely scroll down. –  DGS Sep 18 '13 at 9:53

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