Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I made an example which creates a pthread to print a message. But the output is unexpected.

Code:

System.out.println("Before call native thread");
// invoke the native method to print a message
int socketId = new SocketJNI().createSocket(); //line 7
Thread.sleep(2000);
System.out.println("After call native thread");//line 9: create break point here

C code:

JNIEXPORT jint JNICALL 
Java_SocketJNI_createSocket(JNIEnv * env, jobject obj)
{
    pthread_t thread;
    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, createSocket, NULL);
    return 0;
}

void* createSocket(void *arg) 
{
    printf("Inside native thread(pthread)");
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

Output:

Before call native thread
After call native thread
Inside native thread(pthread)

But I think it should be:

Before call native thread
Inside native thread(pthread)
After call native thread

So, what is the problem? How does pthread work?

Update:

When I reach line 8(on debugging), the pthread(create in line 7) don't print message, It print only:

Before call native thread

I wait, and wait but not thing print After line 9:

Before call native thread
After call native thread
share|improve this question
    
How should we answer this without any snippet of code? Crystal balls are hard to get these days. –  Gyro Gearless Sep 18 '13 at 9:19
    
Your native code and your Java code do not necessarily (i.e. probably don't) use the same streams for output. You imply that your native call is spawning a new thread via pthreads, but you should state explicitly whether that is the case. –  technomage Sep 18 '13 at 17:14
    
I updated my question with C code. "don't use the same streams for output" (@technomage) may be what I need to know. Is there any document about it, @technomage? –  hoangmeo325 Sep 19 '13 at 3:52
    
Try putting a "\n" at the end of your printf, or anyways flush the stdout in the C code. –  Flavio Sep 19 '13 at 15:21
    
Do you have the debugger configured to suspend all threads when you hit a breakpoint? –  Darth Android Sep 19 '13 at 21:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To ensure your output is flushed as soon as you send it, either turn off buffering on System.out or use System.err. On the native side, use stderr (unbuffered) instead of stdout. You can also use System.out.flush() in Java and fflush(stdout) in C to force output of any buffered data.

Note that you still might get some unexpected results, since Java and C don't use the same buffers for output streams, and there's nothing preventing the two outputs from intermixing on their way to the terminal. In practice, though, you'll likely see the output as soon as you flush it (or as soon as it's output if unbuffered).

As for when your thread actually runs, it'll be sometime after you create it. Unless you put in some explicit synchronization, it may not run until long after your Java method has returned. It's up to the system to start the new thread (outside of Java), so any number of factors might delay the thread's start, including system load, memory swapping, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I look for...! System.out.flush(), and fflush(stdout) force output of buffered data. Thanks a lot! –  hoangmeo325 Sep 20 '13 at 5:25

Thread.sleep(2000) is not the way you should be synchronizing threads. the parent thread should join the child thread if you want the parent to wait for the child thread. Here is the createSocket which you should use.

Java_SocketJNI_createSocket(JNIEnv * env, jobject obj)
{
   pthread_t thread;
   pthread_create(&thread, NULL, createSocket, NULL);
   pthread_join(thread,NULL); 
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.