Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose we have followin declaration

enum visibility
{
   On  = 0,
   Off = 1,
   maxVisibility
};

Is the guaranteed value of maxVisibility enumerator 2 in C++11/C++0x standard ?

share|improve this question
1  
I would also suggest you to use strongly-typed enumerations: enum class visibility { ... }, since you can use c++11 features. –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 18 '13 at 9:33
    
By the way, C++0x isn't a standard, it was an unofficial name for C++11 before it became a standard. But I'm just nit-picking. –  Christian Rau Sep 18 '13 at 10:48
    
@ChristianRau C++11 is an equally unofficial name... it is just somewhat easier to type and remember than ISO/IEC 14882:2011. –  Lundin Sep 18 '13 at 11:27
1  
@Lundin Well, true indeed. I should really stop nit-picking if I cannot live up to the responsibility for perfect exactness that comes with it. ;-) –  Christian Rau Sep 18 '13 at 11:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes, it is guaranteed.

§ 7.2.2

If the first enumerator has no initializer,the value of the corresponding constant is zero. An enumerator-definition without an initializer gives the enumerator the value obtained by increasing the value of the previous enumerator by one.

share|improve this answer
1  
So you can even drop the explicit 0 and 1. –  Christian Rau Sep 18 '13 at 10:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.