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Hi I have a sample erlang code as,

%%file_comment
-module(helloworld).
%% ====================================================================
%% API functions
%% ====================================================================
-export([add/2,subtract/2,hello/0,greet_and_math/1]).
%% ====================================================================
%% Internal functions
%% ====================================================================
add(A,B)->
A+B.

subtract(A,B)->
io:format("SUBTRACT!~n"),
A-B.

hello()->
io:format("Hello, world!~n").

greet_and_math(X) ->
hello(),
subtract(X,3),
add(X,2).

And when I run

helloworld:greet_and_math(15).

Output is:

Hello, world!

SUBTRACT!

17

My doubt is why A-B which is 15-2=13 not printed on console?

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2 Answers 2

That's because you never printed 15-2. The code you need would look like this:

%%file_comment
-module(helloworld).
%% ====================================================================
%% API functions
%% ====================================================================
-export([add/2,subtract/2,hello/0,greet_and_math/1]).
%% ====================================================================
%% Internal functions
%% ====================================================================
add(A,B)->
A+B.

subtract(A,B)->
io:format("SUBTRACT!~n"),
io:format("~p~n", [A-B]).   % this will make sure A-B is printed to console

hello()->
io:format("Hello, world!~n").

greet_and_math(X) ->
hello(),
subtract(X,3),
add(X,2).

That will give you:

Hello, world!
SUBTRACT!
12
17

If you wonder why 17 is printed, that's because it is the last expression. This one is always printed to console after executing code because it is actually what is returned by your code. Just execute io:format("hello~n"). on your console and you will see:

hello
ok

ok in this case is returned by io:format, and because it is the last expression, it will be printed.

io:format("hello~n"),
io:format("world~n").

will result in:

hello
world
ok

Only the last ok returned by the second io:format can be seen on console.
I hope you get the idea around how this works.

So in your case by typing:

4> A = helloworld:greet_and_math(15).
Hello, world!
SUBTRACT!
17
5> A.
17
6> 

You see how 17 is the value returned by greet_and_math(15) because it is the last expression? And thus it can be assigned to a variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. I am new to erlang so I was confused a bit. Now I understand that erlang returns the last expression executed, which is happening in the above case. Thanks –  Chakri Sep 18 '13 at 13:27
    
@Chakri if an answer answered your question you should mark it as accepted. Great answer btw. –  user Sep 18 '13 at 17:02
    
Thanks, glad I could be of help. –  a.w. Sep 18 '13 at 17:21

@a.w. it is not that the last value is automatically printed, it the shell which prints the value of the call you make. So when you call greet_and_math(15) the function will:

  • Call hello() which prints the greeting. Its return value of ok from the call to io:format is ignored.
  • Call subtract(X, 3). Its return value of 12 is ignored.
  • Call add(X, 2). Its return value of 17 then becomes the return value of the whole function.

It is this return value of 17 which the shell prints out. So:

  • Everything returns a value, you cannot not return a value.
  • Returning a value and printing a value are very different things.
share|improve this answer
    
You are right! Of course it is not printed like using io:format. Sorry for not making this clearer. So as further addition, one might know that this value (17) is not seen on shell, when the caller is some other program which is not the shell. Then it is just returned to the caller, so it handle the returning value as desired. So thanks for adding this, hopefully it will help readers to understand even better what's happening. –  a.w. Sep 19 '13 at 6:56
    
@a.w. Yes, I have found that sometimes people do get confused about printing values and returning values, especially as the shell prints it for you. –  rvirding Sep 19 '13 at 13:53

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