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I'm playing with functors. I'm using the standard example below:

class C {
public:
    template <typename Func>
    void foo(Func fun)
    {
        fun();
    }
};

struct S {
    void operator()() { printf ("in S\n"); }
};
....
C myClass;
myClass.foo (S());

This works nicely and I don't need to explicitly provide the S template type in the call to foo(), it just figures it out. But suppose I want to store the functor as a member variable and call it later:

class C {
public:
    template <typename Func>
    void foo(Func fun) {
        _myFunc = fun;
    }

    void someOtherThing() { 
        _myFunc();
    }
private:
    WHAT_IS_THIS_TYPE _myFunc;
};

Do I now need to make the whole class a template? If so, can the compiler infer the template type as it did with the single functor, or must I provide it explicitly? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
You can make the whole class a template, and provide a function that deduces the type of the function object. – Xeo Sep 18 '13 at 11:09
    
@Xeo - yeah, that was my first suggestion, but then I deleted my answer, because the topic says: "Avoiding explicit functor template type". – Kiril Kirov Sep 18 '13 at 11:10
    
@Kiril: Read again, I accidentally hit enter too soon. :) – Xeo Sep 18 '13 at 11:10
    
@Xeo - o, I see, sorry :) But then the type must be specified explicitly during the creation of the object OR there must be some constructor, taking the "functor" and storing it. – Kiril Kirov Sep 18 '13 at 11:14
    
@Kiril: This is what I meant. – Xeo Sep 18 '13 at 11:17
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use std::function (in C++11) or boost::function to store callable objects (functions, functors). It implements type erasure pattern.

class C {
public:
  template <typename Func>
  void foo(Func fun) {
    _myFunc = fun;
  }

  void someOtherThing() { 
    _myFunc();
  }
private:

  std::function<void()> _myFunc;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Don't use type-erasure without any need for it. It's not clear if the OP wouldn't be able to use something like auto c = make_C(S());. – Xeo Sep 18 '13 at 11:10
    
The question is titled "Avoiding explicit functor template type". I think it's pretty clearly suggested that he does not want to template C. – Puppy Sep 18 '13 at 11:26

Here's a hand-made way to avoid making class C a template:

struct C {
    template <typename Func>
    void foo(Func fun) {
        _myFunc = static_cast <void*>(&fun);
        stub = call <Func>;
    }

    void someOtherThing() {
        stub(_myFunc);
    }

private:
    void* _myFunc;
    void (*stub)(void*);

    template <typename F>
    static void call(void* f) {
        (*static_cast <F*>(f))();
    }
};

struct S {
    void operator()() { std::cout << "in S" << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
    S s;
    C myClass;
    myClass.foo(s);
    myClass.someOtherThing();
}

When you call foo(), type Func is "stored" inside the template static function call, a pointer to (an instatiation of) which is stored in stub. The latter is called by someOtherThing to actually invoke _myFunc, which is nothing but plain void*. For this to happen, _myFunc is first cast back to the correct type, which is only known inside call's body.

The only catch is that using pointers to functions there can be no inlining for stub(...) call.

share|improve this answer
    
This is effectively the same thing as using std::function, except that it doesn't work for function pointers. – Xeo Sep 18 '13 at 11:21
2  
Actually, it plain doesn't work at all, since _myFunc is a pointer to the argument to the constructor, which is a local variable. Just use std::function like a normal person. – Puppy Sep 18 '13 at 11:25
    
This use of void* is very much C style, dangerous, and very bad practice. C++ provides std::function for this type of thing. Never do this in C++. – Walter Sep 18 '13 at 11:30
    
@Xeo I only wanted to demonstrate how this works. To make it generic, of course you could do a lot things given e.g. 1000 lines of code - or just use std::function. – iavr Sep 18 '13 at 11:36
    
@Puppy/Walter It's almost one year later, but take a look at llvm::function_ref. If you check its source code, it's identical to my answer here. The authors are aware of std::function, yet they choose to do this in C++. So they must not be normal persons, right? – iavr Jul 25 '14 at 19:40

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