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I would like to add a column qc_isotope to an existing psql table sensitivity. The value of qc_isotope must not be NULL and should either equal 'TC' or 'TL' with a default value of 'TC' given to all existing rows in sensitivity. I am fairly new to Postgresql and am unsure how to do this.

Here is my attempt which is unsuccessful

ALTER TABLE sensitivity 
ADD COLUMN qc_isotope VARCHAR(2) CHECK 'NOT NULL' DEFAULT 'TC';
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

try this:

ALTER TABLE sensitivity 
   ADD qc_isotope VARCHAR(2) DEFAULT 'TC' 
       CHECK (qc_isotope IN ('TC', 'TL')) NOT NULL;

The full list of syntax options etc for check constraints is described here. There is also further information on alter table add column statements here.

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You forgot the NOT NULL constraint –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 18 '13 at 11:39
    
@ChrisProsser - It does not seem to like the ENABLE keyword –  moadeep Sep 18 '13 at 11:42
    
@moadeep Apologies, I have corrected the answer above. I am also just checking whether the not null constraint is required in addition. –  ChrisProsser Sep 18 '13 at 11:45
    
Fantastic thanks for the help –  moadeep Sep 18 '13 at 11:46
1  
I edited the answer to make it compatible with Postgres (I incorrectly changed the question's tag to oracle so this is on me). I also replaced the links to the Oracle manual with links to the Postgres manual. –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 18 '13 at 11:55

A different appoach: create a DOMAIN and use that as a data type for qc_isotope. This will come in handy if the data type uccurs in more than one place: the constraint won't have to be repeated.

CREATE DOMAIN QC_ISO VARCHAR(2) CHECK (value IN ('TC', 'TL' ))
        ;

CREATE  TABLE sensitivity
        ( id SERIAL NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
        );

ALTER TABLE sensitivity
        ADD COLUMN qc_isotope QC_ISO NOT NULL DEFAULT 'TC'
        ;

INSERT INTO sensitivity(qc_isotope) VALUES ('AA') ;
INSERT INTO sensitivity(qc_isotope) VALUES ('TC') ;

SELECT * FROM sensitivity;

Result:

CREATE DOMAIN
NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE will create implicit sequence "sensitivity_id_seq" for serial column "sensitivity.id"
NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE / PRIMARY KEY will create implicit index "sensitivity_pkey" for table "sensitivity"
CREATE TABLE
ALTER TABLE
ERROR:  value for domain qc_iso violates check constraint "qc_iso_check"
INSERT 0 1
 id | qc_isotope 
----+------------
  2 | TC
(1 row)

UPDATE: it does appear that DOMAINs can be changed once they are used (this works on PG-9.1):

ALTER DOMAIN QC_ISO
        DROP CONSTRAINT QC_ISO_check -- I don't think the name is important
        ;

ALTER DOMAIN QC_ISO
        ADD CONSTRAINT QC_ISO_check CHECK (value IN ('TC', 'TL', 'AA' ))
        ;
INSERT INTO sensitivity(qc_isotope) VALUES ('AA') ;
INSERT INTO sensitivity(qc_isotope) VALUES ('BB') ;


SELECT * FROM sensitivity;

New result:

ALTER DOMAIN
ALTER DOMAIN
ERROR:  value for domain qc_iso violates check constraint "qc_iso_check"
INSERT 0 1
 id | qc_isotope 
----+------------
  2 | TC
  4 | AA
(2 rows)
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As much as I love the domain concept, the fact that the definition cannot be changed once it is used in a table makes it a bit cumbersome to use. –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 18 '13 at 13:00
    
@a_horse_with_no_name: I just checked: it appears to work. –  wildplasser Sep 18 '13 at 13:13
    
You are right. I was referring to the definition of the datatype which you cannot change e.g. from varchar(20) to varchar(50) if you decided later that you need more characters. A possible workaround is an unbounded type with a check constraint though. –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 18 '13 at 13:18
    
The UDT datatypes are painful. Unfortunately, they are needed e.g. for GIS. Upgrading will cause headaches: lots of dynamic SQL and poking around in the catalogs. –  wildplasser Sep 18 '13 at 13:23

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