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I have a UIView subclass I made for a menu I want to use in my app. The menu can be opened and closed and it has an animation for that:

- (void)hideMenu {
    [UIView animateWithDuration:duration
                   animations:^ {
                     // Do some hiding animation
                     // using CGAffineTransformMake. Ex:
                     [button1 setTransform:CGAffineTransformMake(1, 0, 0, 1, -120, 0)];
                   }
                   completion:^(BOOL finished) {
                     isOpen = NO;
                   }];
}

Through a class method, it instantiates a singleton, so I can use the same instance in many views, and I'd like to have an option to instantiate it either opened or closed.

On the nib file, the objects are initially shown, so I tried to run, after init'ing the singleton the hide method above:

(...)
if (shouldStartClosed)
    [_singleton hideMenu];
return _singleton;

I noticed that the method is, of course, called, every line is run, the BOOL flag changes. However, the objects don't animate properly. And this very same method is called when I press one of the buttons in the menu, and this time it works and the menu is hidden.

What could possibly be the cause of this?

Update: The best solution I've found so far was to repeat the hideMenu method and replacing each button instance variable with [_singleton viewWithTag:#]. Might not be the most elegant, but it the best so far.

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This is the 3rd time I've seen people creating a transform matrix by passing all the components in the last few weeks. Please tell me where this nonsense comes from so that we can put an end to it. Use CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(x, y); and CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(angle); instead! –  David Rönnqvist Sep 18 '13 at 14:37
    
It is commonly used by mathematicians and engineers. No one is forcing you to use it, but depending on the application, providing the matrix can be easier and/or faster than calculating the angles and translation values. –  Guilherme Sep 18 '13 at 14:50
    
I would agree with you if the first four values either represented either a scale or a rotation (or a skew or a combination of them all) but since that matrix is simply a translation along x I think the MakeTranslation(x,y) variant speaks the intent more clearly, even to a mathematician. Besides, it's not like the underlying matrix is any different. I've just seen people make mistakes that a mathematician wouldn't do and I was really wondering where they saw code that used that function. –  David Rönnqvist Sep 18 '13 at 17:48

1 Answer 1

Try a class method for this. Then you don't even need to instantiate the class to call the method. will be like [classwherethemethodis hideMenu:yourbutton]; The main idea is to pass the button as argument if you call it from somewhere else.

+ (void)hideMenu:(UIBUtton*)button {
    [UIView animateWithDuration:duration
                   animations:^ {
                     // Do some hiding animation
                     // using CGAffineTransformMake. Ex:
                     [button setTransform:CGAffineTransformMake(1, 0, 0, 1, -120, 0)];
                   }
                   completion:^(BOOL finished) {
                     //isOpen = NO;
                   }];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid that wouldn't work, since those buttons are loaded from a nib file, and therefore are properties. Class methods cannot access instance variables. –  Guilherme Sep 18 '13 at 14:44

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