Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a measurement-instrument that creates measurements for a specified time. During this time i have to fetch the measurements from the internal memory to prevent an overflow. Currently i have this:

public int FetchDatalog(int Time_s, double Period, out int Count, ref double[] Results)
{
    Count = 0;


    try
    {
        DateTime timeout = DateTime.UtcNow.AddSeconds(Time_s);
        double[] values;

        while (DateTime.UtcNow < timeout)
        {

        values = //here is the command to tell the instrument to return 10 results
        Count = values.Count();
        Thread.Sleep(500);
        //HERE IS SOMETHING MISSING <-----
        }

    }
    return 0;
}

So i have a function that reads in a loop always 10 results from a instruments until a specified time is over. During the loops the read data must be merged.

At the arrow-marked position i need now something that merges the 10 values together and finally returns all merged values back in results.

How can i do this with unknown length?

(As extra problem is: The 10 results can be "up to 10" results. Sometimes less then 10, so i could change here also if needed to only read 1 value, but this would make it slowlier.

Thanks for all help


Added comment here so its readable - Sayse

I mean merge:

loop1: values[]=1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0; 
loop2: values[]=11,22,33,44,55,66,77,88,99,11 
loop3: values[]=111,222,333,444,555,666,777,888,999,111 

This three values should finally return in parameter result as

result[]=1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,11,22,33,44,55,66,
     77,88,99,11,111,222,333,444,555,6‌​66,777,888,999,111

So they should be put together to a bigger array.

share|improve this question
4  
What do you mean by merge them? Sum them, average them, do some other complex computation, what? –  Servy Sep 18 '13 at 14:32
2  
And have you considered returning a List<double> of the results? All this messing around with ref and out parameters is a bit odd (as are your parameter names). –  Jon Skeet Sep 18 '13 at 14:34
1  
Off topic note: I don't think Thread.Sleep is doing anything useful –  Sayse Sep 18 '13 at 14:35
    
Why not just declare a List<double> and at your arrow position, do theList.AddRange(values);. Then you have all the results together once the loop ends. –  DavidAndroidDev Sep 18 '13 at 14:38
    
I mean merge: loop1: values[]=1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0; loop2: values[]=11,22,33,44,55,66,77,88,99,11 loop3: values[]=111,222,333,444,555,666,777,888,999,111 This thre values should finally return in parameter result as result[]=1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,11,22,33,44,55,66,77,88,99,11,111,222,333,444,555,6‌​66,777,888,999,111 So they should be put togehter to a bigger array. –  Thomas Mann Sep 18 '13 at 14:39

1 Answer 1

If you need to maintain the array as your parameter type for some reason, you could just create a list, append to the list, then return the result:

public int FetchDatalog(int Time_s, double Period, out int Count, ref double[] Results)
{
    Count = 0;
    List<double> existing = new List<double>(Results);

    try
    {
        DateTime timeout = DateTime.UtcNow.AddSeconds(Time_s);
        double[] values;    
        while (DateTime.UtcNow < timeout)
        {
            values = //here is the command to tell the instrument to return 10 results
            Count += values.Length;
            Thread.Sleep(500);

            existing.AddRange(values);
        }    
    }
    finally 
    {
        Results = existing.ToArray();        
    }

    return 0;
}

If I had my druthers, it'd look more like:

public int FetchDatalog(int readLength, double sleepPeriod, List<double> results)
{
    var readingsCount = 0;
    try
    {
        var timeout = DateTime.UtcNow.AddSeconds(readLength);
        while (DateTime.UtcNow < timeout)
        {
            values = RetrieveBufferedSensorReadings(10);
            readingsCount += values.Length;
            results.AddRange(values);                
            Thread.Sleep(sleepPeriod);
        }
        return readingsCount;
    }
    catch (Exception e) //<-- this should be special purpose based on sleep/read failures
    {
       throw; //Return -1 or the like if you must... but ew.
    }
}

You could even look at using the newer async functionality in 4.0 as Thread.Sleep is generally considered bad.

EDIT:

Based on your last comment, it seems you are doing this:

double[] Results = new double[100]; 
ret = GetData(TimeSec, out Count, ref Results);

I feel this is poor structure, but we'll go with it as a learning tool:

public int GetData(int Time_s, out int Count, ref double[] Results)
{

    var lengthIncrement = 100;
    Count = 0;

    try
    {
        DateTime timeout = DateTime.UtcNow.AddSeconds(Time_s);
        double[] values;    
        while (DateTime.UtcNow < timeout)
        {
            values = //here is the command to tell the instrument to return 10 results

            //Before copying over value, make sure we won't overflow
            //If we will, extend array
            if (Count + values.Length > Results.Length) {
               var temp = new double[Results.Length + lengthIncrement];
               Array.Copy(Results, temp, Count);
               Results = temp;
            }                

            Array.Copy(values, 0, Results, Count, values.Length);
            Count += values.Length;
            Thread.Sleep(500);
        }    
    }

    return 0;
}

An ideone example.

Allow me to reiterate what many other's are saying... The following is a much better design:

var results = new List<double>(); 
ret = GetData(TimeSec, out Count, results);
share|improve this answer
1  
I would move the instantiation of existing before the while and set Results after so you dont create a new List every iteration. –  Cemafor Sep 18 '13 at 14:40
    
Solid suggestion –  Jaime Torres Sep 18 '13 at 14:40
    
Thank you for the code-sxample. It works great. @Cemafor: Can you please describe what i have to change then? Thanks –  Thomas Mann Sep 18 '13 at 14:51
    
@ThomasMann, He already added my suggestion into his code. I think the edit was soon enough where it doesnt show as an edit on the answer. Although, the try finally seams a little weird. What was the try doing in the original code? –  Cemafor Sep 18 '13 at 14:54
    
The try in his original code wasn't doing anything... I just stole it and used the finally to ensure his return variable was updated. –  Jaime Torres Sep 18 '13 at 14:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.