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Let's say I have

List<object> mainList = new List<object>();

And it contains

List<string> stringList = new List<string();
List<CustomClass> custList = new List<CustomClass>();
mainList.Add(stringList);
mainList.Add(custList);

To serialize

Stream stream;
BinaryFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
formatter.Serialize(stream, mainList);

To deserialize

Stream stream = (Stream)o;
BinaryFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
List<object> retrievedList = (List<object>)formatter.Deserialize(stream);

At this point, I receive an error that the stream read (deserialization) reached the end of the stream without retrieving a value.

Do I need to specify something besides...

[Serializable]
public class CustomClass { .... }

in the custom class to make this work? Can I not deserialize a List> that contains different type of object every time?

I tried

IList list = (IList)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(custClassList[0]))

and tried to send and receive this, but got the same issue.

I can however serialize and deserialize a specified type or List, but I really need it to be dynamic.

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without Serializable attribute or implementing ISerializable interface you can't serialize a Type with BinaryFormatter –  Sriram Sakthivel Sep 18 '13 at 15:24
    
is this line just a typo? List<object> retrievedList = formatter.Serialize(stream); or is this from your code? ;) –  olydis Sep 18 '13 at 15:25
    
List<object> retrievedList = formatter.Serialize(stream); should be List<object> retrievedList = (List<object>)formatter.Deserialize(stream); in order to compile. I assume it is a typo. Correct it –  Sriram Sakthivel Sep 18 '13 at 15:28
    
what Sriram Sakthivel suggested ;) but your code would not even compile if you had it like posted in your question so I think you meant Deserialize anyway (with a cast of course) –  olydis Sep 18 '13 at 15:30
    
Still not correct. –  Sriram Sakthivel Sep 18 '13 at 15:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Basically, BinaryFormatter is a joke. It works in some cases, but will fail in almost identical scenarios for unknown reasons.

The best and superior alternative to BinaryFormatter is the third-Party library, Protobuf, developed by Google

https://code.google.com/p/protobuf-net/ This beauty solved all the problems I was having in one pass. It's much easier to set up and reacts more perfectly to complex, custom classes.

I should also mention that it's faster, in the terms of de/serialization.

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1  
"usually" faster. I've found if you've got large arrays of primitives (eg int[]) then BinaryFormatter is faster than Protobuf.Net –  mcmillab Nov 11 '13 at 22:08
1  
Protobuf-net (at least the .net port) was created by Marc Gravell, not google. It just happens to be hosted on google.code. –  Phil Cooper Dec 22 '14 at 14:31

In order to fix the issue that causes the error "stream read (deserialization) reached the end of the stream ", the stream position needs to reset to 0 as follows...

stream.Position = 0;

Do I need to specify something besides...

[Serializable] public class CustomClass { .... }

Nope...That should be good for what you are doing.

in the custom class to make this work? Can I not deserialize a List> that contains different type of object every time?

You should be able to serialize any object.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried that. I'm reading from a NamedPipeServerStream that's been written to by a NamedPipeClientStream, which will give me an error saying that it "can't seek." –  Glimpse Sep 18 '13 at 15:46

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