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Quick question for an issue I haven't managed to solve quickly:

I'm working with a .csv file and can't seem to find a simple way to convert strings to floats. Here's my code,

import csv

def readLines():
    with open('testdata.csv', 'rU') as data:
        reader = csv.reader(data)
        row = list(reader)
        for x in row:
            for y in x:
                print type(float(y)),
readLines()

As you can see, it will currently print the type of every y element in x set of lists in the variable row; this produces a long list of "<type 'float'>". But this doesn't actually change each element to a float, nor does setting the for loop to execute float(y) (a type test returns 'string' for each element) work either.

I also tried literal_eval, but that failed as well. The only way to change the list elements to floats is to create a new list, either with list comprehension or manually, but that loses the original formatting of each list (as lists of a set amount of elements within one larger list).

I suppose the overall question is really just "What's the easiest way to read, organize, and synthesize data in .csv or excel format using Python?"

Thanks in advance to those courteous/knowledgeable enough to help.

share|improve this question
1  
type does not change the type of a variable, it just returns the type of the variable.once you convert the variable to float you need to assign it in-place –  Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Sep 18 '13 at 16:28
    
maybe you want y = float(y) –  cmd Sep 18 '13 at 16:30
    
The answer to your "overall question" may be "Pandas", although it's a bit vague. –  Wooble Sep 18 '13 at 16:30

4 Answers 4

When converting a bunch of strings to floats, you should use a try/except to catch errors:

def conv(s):
    try:
        s=float(s)
    except ValueError:
        pass    
    return s

print [conv(s) for s in ['1.1','bls','1','nan', 'not a float']] 
# [1.1, 'bls', 1.0, nan, 'not a float']

Notice that the strings that cannot be converted are simply passed through unchanged.

A csv file IS a text file, so you should use a similar functionality:

def readLines():
    def conv(s):
        try:
            s=float(s)
        except ValueError:
            pass    
        return s

    with open('testdata.csv', 'rU') as data:
        reader = csv.reader(data)
        for row in reader:
            for cell in row:
                y=conv(cell)
              # do what ever with the single float
         # OR
         # yield [conv(cell) for cell in row]  if you want to write a generator...    
share|improve this answer
    
good, but it seems that all of the cells indeed are floats. –  Antti Haapala Sep 18 '13 at 16:33

Try something like the following

import csv

def read_lines():
    with open('testdata.csv', 'rU') as data:
        reader = csv.reader(data)
        for row in reader:
            yield [ float(i) for i in row ]

for i in read_lines():
    print(i)

# to get a list, instead of a generator, use
xy = list(read_lines())

As for the easiest way, then I suggest you see the xlrd, xlwt modules, personally I always have hard time with all the varying CSV formats.

share|improve this answer
for y in x:
                print type(float(y)),

float(y) takes the value of y and returns a float based on it. It does not modify y- it returns a new object.

y = float(y)

is more like what you are looking for- you have to modify the objects.

share|improve this answer

Got it:

def read_lines2():
    with open('testdata.csv', 'rU') as data:
        reader = csv.reader(data)
        for row in reader:
            new = [float(x) for x in row if x != '']
read_lines2()

Let me know if there are still improvements that can be made - thanks!

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