Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, I am trying to computer the difference between two dates in time, and out puting that difference in days, hours, and minutes. I've been running this sample code just as a java console application and it works fine, however, when I try to do the same thing in Android, I get garbage data. Is Joda Time too complex for Android? Should I try out Date4j as an alternative?

import java.util.; import org.joda.;
import org.joda.time.DateTime;

public class time {

        //(5000);
        final static long MILLIS_IN_DAY = 86400000;
        final static long MILLIS_IN_HOUR = 3600000;
        final static long MILLIS_IN_MINUTE = 60000;

    public static void main(String[] args){

        long day, hour, minute;

        //MAKE SURE TO CHECK IF USER SET(LATER)
        // DateTime(2013,9,12,0,0)
                DateTime d1 = new DateTime(2013,9,17,0,0);
                DateTime d2 = new DateTime(2013,9,12,21,30);


                //long date = d2.getMillis();

                DateTime d3 = new DateTime();

                long diffInMillis = d3.getMillis() - d1.getMillis();
                minute = (diffInMillis/MILLIS_IN_MINUTE)%60;
                hour = (diffInMillis/MILLIS_IN_HOUR)%24;
                day = (diffInMillis/MILLIS_IN_DAY);


                System.out.println(Long.toString(d1.getMillis()));
                System.out.println(Long.toString(d2.getMillis()));  

                System.out.println(Long.toString(d3.getMillis()));

                System.out.println(Long.toString(diffInMillis));

                System.out.println("Minutes:");
                System.out.println(Long.toString(minute));
                System.out.println("Hours:");
                System.out.println(Long.toString(hour));
                System.out.println("Days:");
                System.out.println(Long.toString(day));
    }
    }
share|improve this question
1  
Is Joda Time too complex for Android? What does that even mean? –  Vikram Sep 18 '13 at 16:47
    
define "garbage data", that's a bit too unspecific. (i.e. post expected and actual result) –  njzk2 Sep 18 '13 at 16:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't calculate this values manually. Calculate with Joda-Time methods. There is no reason to use Joda and don't use Joda's methods
E.g.
with Days, Hours, Mintes

    System.out.println("Minutes:");
    System.out.println(Minutes.minutesBetween(d2, d1).getMinutes() % 60);
    System.out.println("Hours:");
    System.out.println(Hours.hoursBetween(d2, d1).getHours() % 24);
    System.out.println("Days:");
    System.out.println(Days.daysBetween(d2, d1).getDays());  

or with Period

    Period period = new Period(d2, d1);
    System.out.println("Minutes:");
    System.out.println(period.getMinutes());
    System.out.println("Hours:");
    System.out.println(period.getHours());
    System.out.println("Days:");
    System.out.println(period.getDays());
share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't aware of the Period class, Thank you for that. I used it and things computed much better. However, for any future readers, I did find one problem with the getDays() methood, it wil return either 0,1,2,3,4,5,6- but never anything more. Since I was trying to get a sum of total days, this is what I ended up doing: Period p1 = new Period(quitDate1,d1.getMillis()); long s = d1.getMillis() - quitDate1; float x = (float)s/MILLIS_IN_DAY; day = (int)x; minute = p1.getMinutes(); hour = p1.getHours(); –  TaylorTheDeveloper Sep 19 '13 at 19:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.