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I have 2 classes, A and B.

In class A, I have a pointer on B called Bptr.

I allocate memory for Bptr in the constructor of A, and I free memory of Bptr in A's destructor.

class B {
//whatever
public:
    B(int,int);
}

class A {
private:
    B * Bptr;
public:
    A();
}

A::A(){
    Bptr = new B(2,5);
}

A::~A(){
    delete Bptr;
}

How can I integrate Boost in my code and use the smart pointer : boost::shared_ptr ? How would my code look like?

Thanks a lot!

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Have you read the documentation ? I'm a little confused about what exactly it is you are wondering about. –  us2012 Sep 18 '13 at 17:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
class B {
//whatever
public:
    B(int,int);
}

class A {
private:
    boost::shared_ptr<B> Bptr;
public:
    A();
}

A::A(){
    Bptr = boost::make_shared<B>(2,5);
}

A::~A(){
  // Bptr automatically deleted if this is the only boost::shared_ptr pointing to it
}

Although you could simply use new B(2,5) instead of boost::make_shared<B>, the latter is exception-safe.

share|improve this answer
    
@us2012 oops copy/paste typo. good catch –  SchighSchagh Sep 18 '13 at 17:14
    
Can you clarify the condition : "if this is the only boost::shared_ptr pointing to it"? If it's not the only one, how can I deal with? Notice: I'm in a multi-threading context. Thanks! –  Julia Sep 19 '13 at 9:13
1  
@user1459961: If it's not the only owner, then destroying it just releases its share of the ownership without deleting the object. The object will be deleted when the last shared pointer is destroyed. You shouldn't have to do anything to deal with it. –  Mike Seymour Sep 19 '13 at 10:29
    
Thank you for the clarification. +1 –  Julia Sep 19 '13 at 18:08

The first question to ask yourself: why do you want to dynamically allocate the object in the first place? Can you just replace the pointer with a member of type B?

Assuming there is a good reason, then why shared_ptr (rather than scoped_ptr or, in modern C++, unique_ptr)? Why do you need shared ownership?

Once you've answered these questions, and determined that shared ownership is the right solution, just replace B* with a shared pointer, initialise it in the constructor, and get rid of the redundant destructor (assuming it's not needed for anything else).

class A {
private:
    boost::shared_ptr<B> Bptr;
public:
    A() : Bptr(boost::make_shared<B>(2,5)) {}
};

You could simply initialise it with a pointer, Bptr(new B(2,5)), but using make_shared makes more efficient use of memory and (in more complicated situations than this) makes it easier to ensure exception safety.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the clever questions. My boss said it's for multi-threading. I didn't verify if he's right in that. –  Julia Sep 19 '13 at 9:11
    
For the use, it would : Bptr->B_attribute_1, having B_attribute_1 a public attribute of B, right? Thanks –  Julia Sep 19 '13 at 9:16
1  
@user1459961: Yes, smart pointers provide * and -> operators, so they can be dereferenced like regular pointers. –  Mike Seymour Sep 19 '13 at 10:26
    
Thank u for your answer! +1 –  Julia Sep 19 '13 at 12:17

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