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Suppose I have the following definition of List and Node:


template <class T> 
class List {
    public:
        class Iterator;
        class ConstIterator;

        //Constructors and Destructors.
        List() : head(NULL), tail(NULL), size(0) {}
        List(const List& list);
        ~List();

        //Methods
        Iterator begin();
        ConstIterator begin() const;
        Iterator end();
        ConstIterator end() const;
        void insert(const T& data);
        void insert(const T& data, const Iterator& iterator);
        void remove(const Iterator& iterator);
        int getSize() const;
        Iterator find(const T& item);
        ConstIterator find(const T& item) const;
        void sort();

        //Operators
        List operator = (const List& list);


    private:
        class Node;
        Node* head;
        Node* tail;
        int size;
};


template <class T>
class List<T>::Node
{
    public:
        //Constructors and destructors
        Node(const T& _data, const Node* _next) : data(_data), next(_next) {}       
        ~Node(); //Destructor 

        //Methods


        //Operators
        Node operator = (const Node& node);

    private:
        T data;
        Node* next;
};

I'm writing a function to insert data into a list like this:


    template<class T>
    void List<T>::insert(const T& data)
    {
    Node newNode = new Node(data, NULL);

    if (head == NULL)
    {
        head = &newNode;
        tail = &newNode;
    }
    else
    {
        (*tail)->next = &newNode;
        tail = &newNode;
    }
    size++;
}

However what I find strange is that if I swap (*tail)->next = &newNode; to (*tail).next = &newNode; it still compiles. Why, and what is the correct way of doing it?

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Can you show the definition of Node ? –  Mahesh Sep 18 '13 at 17:13
    
I did, just scroll down. –  Doppelganger Sep 18 '13 at 17:16
    
Wait. template <class T> class List<T>::Node means Node is privately inherited by List. Isn't it ? Or am I missing something here ? –  Mahesh Sep 18 '13 at 17:19
    
You're not missing anything. The problem is the templates. They don't get compiled until instantiated so crazy mistakes look like they compile. This happens a lot. –  Ray Toal Sep 18 '13 at 17:35
    
If this is not homework then just use the STL instead - it is all done for you! If it is homework perhaps passing parameters in as references would maker things easier. Also use nullptr instead of NULL –  Ed Heal Sep 18 '13 at 17:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The definitions of your classes can be (for the purposes of this question) simplified into:

class List {
    ...
    private:
        Node* head;
        Node* tail;
};

class Node {
    ...
    private:
        Node* next;
};

Now in your List::insert method:

Node newNode = new Node(data, NULL);
(*tail)->next = &newNode;

...when you use new expression, the result will be pointer to the newly allocated memory.
What you should do is:

Node* newNode = new Node(data, NULL);
tail->next = newNode;                // <-- equivalent to (*tail).next = newNode;
share|improve this answer
    
A strange assingment (*tail)->next. I guess to this be valid, tail must be defined as a double pointer (Node **tail) –  Tomás Badan Sep 18 '13 at 17:23
    
@TomásBadan: Yes, you're right :) –  LihO Sep 18 '13 at 17:28

Using Node->tail is short form of writing (*Node).tail. Both forms are valid. Strangeus is the fact that you say that (*Node)->tail compiles. To this happens, Node must be defined as a double pointer, i.e.:

Node **tail;

But your code has some others bugs in. In this line:

Node newNode = new Node(data, NULL);

you are define a local object and assing a dynamic memory to it. The correct way is:

Node *newNode = new Node(data, NULL);  // defining it as a pointer

and instead of assing as:

head = &newNode;

do:

head = newNode;

As a final note, consider using smart pointer instead of raw pointer. The former is safer than the last

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The -> operator will automatically derefference a pointer for you then call the method to the right. So:

tail->next

would also work but

tail.next

wouldn't because tail is a pointer. To use the . operator you have to defrence the pointer first as in

(*tail).next

(*tail)

turns your pointer into an object. At that point you can use either -> or .

A . will not work on a pointer but -> will.

Generally, just for easy of typing I use -> because it is shorter then using (*) to turn a pointer into an object just so I can use a dot but they are equivalent operations.

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1  
I think you didn't get the question correctly. OP says it still compiles if changed one to other. In my view, it shouldn't. –  Mahesh Sep 18 '13 at 17:15
    
If the syntax is similar to C, I have hard time understanding why this compiles. –  Doppelganger Sep 18 '13 at 17:16
    
@Mahesh Sorry if I wasn't clear. Both syntaxes are valid and do compile because they are equivalent. tail is a pointer. *tail is an object. -> can be used on objects or pointers, . can only be used on an object. Since he turns his pointer into an object he can use either –  Vulcronos Sep 18 '13 at 17:25

You have noticed that (*tail)->next = &newNode and (*tail).next = &newNode both compile, which strikes you as odd.

But somehow you might also have noticed that this line also compiles!

Node newNode = new Node(data, NULL);

That is the thing that you should give you pause.

You are inside of a template here. Lots of things "compile".

Did you try instantiating the template?

ADDENDUM:

Here just to show you how crazy things can be, check out this program:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class C {
  void f();
};

template <class T>
void C<T>::f() {
  int x = new int;
}

int main() {
  std::cout << "Hello, world\n";
}

Now check this out:

$ g++ template-example.cpp && ./a.out 
Hello, world

But now notice

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main() {
  int x = new int;
  std::cout << "Hello, world\n";
}

which yields:

$ g++ hello.cpp
hello.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
hello.cpp:4: error: invalid conversion from ‘int*’ to ‘int’

TL;DR: WHEN YOU ARE IN A TEMPLATE, THINGS THAT SHOULD NOT COMPILE SOMETIMES "DO"! (They're not really compiling -- YET!)

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