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obj = SomeObject.new

def obj.new_method
  "do some things"
end

puts obj.new_method
> "do some things"

This works ok. However, I need to do same thing inside an existing method:

def some_random_method
  def obj.new_method
    "do some things"
  end
end

Works ok as well, but having a method inside a method looks pretty horrible. The question is, is there any alternate way of adding such a method?

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Are you sure the second snippet of code works? Because I suppose it should be accepting obj as a method argument first to define a singleton method over it. –  Chirantan Dec 11 '09 at 12:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 39 down vote accepted

It's been a long time since I asked this. In ruby 1.9+, there's a better way of doing this by using define_singleton_method, as follows:

obj = SomeObject.new

obj.define_singleton_method(:new_method) do
  "do some things"
end
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What will happen if I use @field inside of this do block? Will I access a field from current class, or will it use field of obj? –  ciembor Jan 31 '13 at 10:30
1  
Haven't really tested this properly, but as far as I can tell the mixin and this approach are not equivalent. This has access to outside values, whereas a mixin does not. –  vise Jan 31 '13 at 13:10

Use a Mixin.

module AdditionalMethods
  def new_method
    "do some things"
  end
end

obj = SomeObject.new
obj.extend(AdditionalMethods)

puts obj.new_method
> "do some things"
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You can use modules.

module ObjSingletonMethods
  def new_method
    "do some things"
  end
end


obj.extend ObjSingletonMethods

puts obj.new_method # => do some things

Now if you need to add more methods to that object, you just need to implement the methods in the module and you are done.

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Just an interesting point to note:

if you had instead gone:

def my_method
    def my_other_method; end
end

Then my_other_method would actually be defined on the CLASS of the object not withstanding that the receiver ofmy_method is an instance.

However if you go (as you did):

def my_method
    def self.my_other_method; end
end

Then my_other_method is defined on the eigenclass of the instance.

Not directly relevant to your question but kind of interesting nonetheless ;)

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