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If I have a unix file contains the following:

aaaa12
bbbb34
ssss56
qqqq78
oooo90
aaaa01
bbbb23

I want to search for different patterns in different lines. in the above example if i want to print the lines that contain the two patterns (aaaa) and (bbbb) the output should be:

aaaa12
bbbb34
aaaa01
bbbb23

In the same order as the original file What is the suitable unix command to do this

I tried egrep "aaaa | bbbb" but the output was:

aaaa12
aaaa01
bbbb34
bbbb23
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From the input you have, this output seems impossible using egrep. egrep doesn't swap line numbers inside a file. What OS and egrep version are you using ? and How about the awk command I posted ? –  iamauser Sep 18 '13 at 19:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This may work for you :

egrep "(aaaa|bbbb)" file

or you can use awk :

awk '/aaaa/||/bbbb/{print}' file

In both these cases, it searches for pattern "aaaa" or "bbbb" in the file and displays them as they are in the file. the brackets () in egrep is for grouping. More explanation on egrep regex can be found in here :

http://www.gnu.org/software/findutils/manual/html_node/find_html/egrep-regular-expression-syntax.html

Result is this :

$]egrep "(aaaa|bbbb)" file
 aaaa12
 bbbb34
 aaaa01
 bbbb23
  • EDIT

OP probably wants the output in a single line rather than multiple lines. For that, you can do :

egrep "aaaa|bbbb" file | awk '{printf $0" "}'

OR

awk '/aaaa/||/bbbb/{printf $0" "}' file

Result :

aaaa12 bbbb34 aaaa01 bbbb23
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I tried egrep but it displays the lines that match the first pattern followed by the lines match the second.. I want the output of the lines to be ordered as they in the file –  user2792748 Sep 18 '13 at 18:50
    
Can u explain your above answer please –  user2792748 Sep 18 '13 at 18:52
    
I have added what exactly I typed. It matches with your expected output that you've showed in your question... –  iamauser Sep 18 '13 at 18:52
    
Awk defaults to printing the whole line, so you don't need the {print}. And it supports alternation, so you can just use /aaa|bbb/ –  Kevin Sep 18 '13 at 18:53
    
@Kevin You are right, but print adds to the verbosity needed for a beginner. OP may not know what is default in awk. –  iamauser Sep 18 '13 at 18:54

Try the following

grep "aaaa\|bbbb" file

now it really works.

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You need to make it an ERE (-E or -r, depending on your implementation) or use \|. –  Kevin Sep 18 '13 at 18:54
    
Yep, of course, you are right. Did not have a version of grep installed on my current notebook. Just checked it and will edit my post. –  cars10 Sep 18 '13 at 18:56

The simplest form for that is to use two expressions with -e:

egrep -e aaaa -e bbbb file
fgrep -e aaaa -e bbbb file

Output:

aaaa12
bbbb34
aaaa01
bbbb23
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