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I have two tables in SQL Server 2008 -

Sales.SalesOrderHeader --> CustomerID(FK, int, not null), OrderDate
(datetime, not null), etc...
Sales.Individual --> CustomerID(PK, FK, int, not null), ContactID
(FK, int, not null), etc...

I have to find the the customers (ie CustomerID and the Corresponding ContactID) that ordered something on the last day orders were placed.

This query is used to find the last OrderDate

   select MAX(Soh.OrderDate) 
   from Sales.SalesOrderHeader as Soh

Now, the next thing to do is get the CustomerID and Contact ID. I thought of two ways - Using only sub queries and where clauses OR Join and one sub query. The two approaches are shown below:

--Style1: Using only subquery

select Si.CustomerID, Si.ContactID
from Sales.Individual as Si
where Si.CustomerID in
( 
  select Soh.CustomerID
  from Sales.SalesOrderHeader as Soh
  where Soh.OrderDate = 
  (
    select MAX(Soh.OrderDate) 
    from Sales.SalesOrderHeader as Soh
  )
) 
order by Si.CustomerID, Si.ContactID

--Style 2: Using inner join

select CustOnLastDay.CustomerID, Si.ContactID
from
(
  select Soh.CustomerID, Soh.ContactID
  from Sales.SalesOrderHeader as Soh
  where Soh.OrderDate = 
  (
    select MAX(Soh.OrderDate) 
    from Sales.SalesOrderHeader as Soh
  )
) as CustOnLastDay
inner join Sales.Individual as Si
on CustOnLastDay.ContactID = Si.ContactID
order by Si.CustomerID, Si.ContactID

Question - Which is better, sub queries only or joins (In general and this case) ?
Btw, most of my tables don't have more than 14-15k rows.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Why I need the ContactID also ? I have to look it up in another table to get the name of the customer (ID) as well. But, I did not include that part because it would make the question too long, perhaps without adding any value to it. If you want my final query, I can put that too. –  Steam Sep 18 '13 at 20:34
1  
Generally, you want to avoid nested subqueries for the sake of clarity and readability. –  RBarryYoung Sep 18 '13 at 20:34
    
@RBarryYoung - Yes, that makes sense. But is there an impact on speed of execution of query or anything else ? –  Steam Sep 18 '13 at 20:39
2  
Using a JOIN does not necessarily return the same result as using a sub-query. But if they are equivalent, SQL Server will notice that and both versions will most probably use the same execution plan. –  a_horse_with_no_name Sep 18 '13 at 20:50
1  
As noted in my comment to one of the answers (and as @a_horse_with_no_name also says), if they are functionally equivalent, then generally they will perform the same. This is because most modern professional optimizers such as SQL Server's (or Oracle's or DB2's) are very good and figure this out. Many older versions (10+ years) and many current non-professional DBMS's (such as MySQL) do still demonstrate this problem of subqueries being significantly slower than JOINs. –  RBarryYoung Sep 18 '13 at 21:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In JOINs RDBMS can create an execution plan which makes it faster as compared to sub query. In many cases you will find that JOINS are comparatively faster than subquery. However when they are functionaly equivalent, they will perform the same. Subquery loads all the data for processing

MSDN says:-

Many Transact-SQL statements that include subqueries can be alternatively formulated as joins. Other questions can be posed only with subqueries. In Transact-SQL, there is usually no performance difference between a statement that includes a subquery and a semantically equivalent version that does not. However, in some cases where existence must be checked, a join yields better performance. Otherwise, the nested query must be processed for each result of the outer query to ensure elimination of duplicates. In such cases, a join approach would yield better results.

For example:-

If you are doing something like this:-

select * from table1 where exists select * from table2 where table2.parent=table1.id

then it is better to use JOIN

Check this Example which explains the difference between SUBQUERY and JOIN performance:-

USE AdventureWorks
GO
-- use of =
SELECT *
FROM HumanResources.Employee E
WHERE E.EmployeeID = ( SELECT EA.EmployeeID
FROM HumanResources.EmployeeAddress EA
WHERE EA.EmployeeID = E.EmployeeID)
GO
-- use of in
SELECT *
FROM HumanResources.Employee E
WHERE E.EmployeeID IN ( SELECT EA.EmployeeID
FROM HumanResources.EmployeeAddress EA
WHERE EA.EmployeeID = E.EmployeeID)
GO
-- use of exists
SELECT *
FROM HumanResources.Employee E
WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT EA.EmployeeID
FROM HumanResources.EmployeeAddress EA
WHERE EA.EmployeeID = E.EmployeeID)
GO
-- Use of Join
SELECT *
FROM HumanResources.Employee E
INNER JOIN HumanResources.EmployeeAddress EA ON E.EmployeeID = EA.EmployeeID
GO

Now compare the execution plan:-

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I am "new" to sql so I cannot understand what you said. Can you give me some proof for this ? –  Steam Sep 18 '13 at 20:36
    
@blasto:- Updated my answer!! Does that makes sense now??? –  Rahul Tripathi Sep 18 '13 at 20:40
1  
Thanks. What are the reasons for this ? --> In Transact-SQL, there is usually no performance difference between a statement that includes a subquery and a semantically equivalent version that does not. However, in some cases where existence must be checked, a join yields better performance. –  Steam Sep 18 '13 at 20:49
    
@blasto:- I would recommend you to go through the link which I have shared you will surely get something fruitfull :) –  Rahul Tripathi Sep 18 '13 at 20:55
1  
You say "In most cases you will find that JOINS are comparatively faster than subquery.", this is not true. In most cases where they are functionaly equivalent, they will perform the same. This is evidenced by your own quotation from MSDN: "In Transact-SQL, there is usually no performance difference between a statement that includes a subquery and a semantically equivalent version that does not." The same is generally true for all modern production SQL DBMS's (such as Oracle and DB2) because they have excellent SQL Optimizers. –  RBarryYoung Sep 18 '13 at 21:13

Join is generally preferred to the multi-level nesting with subqueries. In general joins are faster as SQL server Engine can better optimize this type of query.

share|improve this answer

Inner joins are typically faster than subqueries as the subqueries are typically executed each time for whatever the current record is in the first part of the from clause...

Also, you could do better by having the MAX() order date as it's own query so it's not done on every record and join down stream. Ensure you have index on your order header table. I would have it based on (orderdate,customerid) so it's a covering index and doesn't need to go back to the raw data pages for other criteria as the order date and customer ID are in the index that it can utilize.

I would revise the query as...

select
      soh2.CustomerID,
      si.ContactID
   from
      ( select max( soh.orderdate ) MaxDate
           from sales.salesorderheader soh ) as JustDate
         join sales.salesorderheader soh2
            on JustDate.MaxDate = soh2.OrderDate
            join Sales.Individual SI
               on soh2.CustomerID = SI.CustomerID
   order by
      soh2.CustomerID, 
      si.ContactID
share|improve this answer

Neither! Look into the ranking functions for some inspiration. ANSI SQL calls these window functions. You may find DENSE_RANK() is exactly what you need to grab the latest date in an elegant way:

select *
from (
    select Si.CustomerID, Si.ContactID,
    DENSE_RANK() OVER(ORDER BY soh.OrderDate DESC) as DenseRank 
    from Sales.Individual Si
    inner join SalesOrderHeader soh on soh.CustomerId = Si.CustomerId
) subquery
where subquery.DenseRank = 1 
share|improve this answer

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