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Will it consume from all of them? Will it throw an exception?

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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can have multiple endpoints for the same contract and different addresses in your clieint config, no problem.

They need to be separated by a unique name= attribute on the <endpoint> tag.

<client>
  <endpoint name="tcpEndpoint"
            address="net.tcp://server:8888/SomeService"
            binding="netTcpBinding"
            contract="IYourService" />
  <endpoint name="httpEndpoint"
            address="http://server:8777/SomeService"
            binding="basicHttpBinding"
            contract="IYourService" />
</client>

When you create your client proxy, you need to provide the name of the endpoint you want to use:

YourClient client = new YourClient("netTcpEndpoint");

You can no longer just instantiate your client and expect it to find "the" endpoint to use, since there are multiple (and there's no way to define one as the "default" which gets used if nothing is specified, unfortunately).

Other than that - no problems should arise, I think.

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ya. wouldn't make sense to connect with ex: basicHttpbinding + wsHttpBinding + netTcpBinding at the same time. –  vidalsasoon Dec 11 '09 at 14:04
    
@vidal: not really, no :-) But you could potentitally have one client going over netTcp, and another client instance going over http - if you ever need to (not sure why that would be needed - but you could ;-) –  marc_s Dec 11 '09 at 14:05
1  
If you have a java web client and a .Net thick client for a real life example. The java client uses http and .Net client uses net.tcp –  Pratik Dec 11 '09 at 14:29
1  
@Patrik: yes, sure, in that scenario, it makes total sense. I was just wondering if it would ever make sense to have one .NET client use two different endpoints at the same time.... –  marc_s Dec 11 '09 at 15:23
    
@marc_s For instance a Silverlight client (Polling Duplex) and a WPF client (any other binding type) since Polling Duplex is exclusive for Silverlight. –  Eduardo Brites Aug 27 '13 at 16:14
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