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Ok I have an abstract class 'Order':

public abstract class Order {
protected String location;
protected double price;

public Order(double price, String location){
    this.price = price;
    this.location = location;
}
public abstract double calculateBill();

public String getLocation() {
    return location;
}
public double getPrice() {
    return price;
}
public abstract String printOrder(String format);   
}

I also have 3 classes that implement it that are similar except, of course, that they calculateBill differently according to tax, tariff, etc.

now I am trying to create and OrderManager class to manage them. This is what I have so far

public class OrderManager {
private ArrayList<Order> orders;

public OrderManager() {     
}   
public OrderManager(ArrayList<Order> orders) {
    this.orders = orders;   
}   
public void addOrder(Order o) {
    orders.add(o);
}   
public ArrayList<Order> getOrdersAbove(double val) {
    for (Order o : orders) {
        double bill = o.calculateBill();
        if (bill > val)
            orders.add(o);
    }
    return orders;
}

I'm having trouble with the getOrdersAbove method which should return and array list of orders whose bill is above val. Being the calculateBill is abstract and implemented in each subclass of order I should just be able to call it correct? Also if that is the case then shouldn't OrderManager extend Order? Or just being in the same package would allow me to call it's methods? Or am I going about it all wrong?

Thanks for any and all help!

share|improve this question
    
Are you actually having a problem? Your code seems sensible - you don't want OrderManager as a subclass of Order. – John3136 Sep 18 '13 at 21:57
    
@John3136 I was having trouble with the loop but I think I got it fixed, but someone mentioned that I need the values to be added to a different arraylist. So would i need to declare a new list in the method itself or is it even need it? – user2745043 Sep 18 '13 at 22:26

Being the calculateBill is abstract and implemented in each subclass of order I should just be able to call it correct?

The method is declared as public, you will be able to call it on Order instances.

Also if that is the case then shouldn't OrderManager extend Order?

Ask yourself: is an OrderManager an Order? No? So don't make it extend Order.

Or just being in the same package would allow me to call it's methods?

Again, the method is public, so you can call it from anywhere as long as you have an instance to call it on.

So in your for loop

public ArrayList<Order> getOrdersAbove(double val) {
    for (Order o : orders) {
        double bill = o.calculateBill();
        // do logic
    }
}

When calling calculateBill(), Java will use late-binding (polymorphism) to resolve the actual implementation of the method to use.

share|improve this answer
    
And I don't see how that is difficult to test, right? – Marcelo Sep 18 '13 at 21:57
1  
@Marcelo I agree. I wanted to throw in concepts like late-binding and polymorphism. – Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 18 '13 at 21:58
    
Your answer is pretty good, sorry to put that comment here, wanted to sympathize with you on what I was thinking about the question. – Marcelo Sep 18 '13 at 22:00

Your OrderManager doesn't need to know anything about the calculateBill method of subclasses of Order.

As long as the method is overriden you can be sure that you will be allowed to invoke it if it's public (or they're in same package) since you can't reduce the visibility of an inherited method.

Even if Order is abstract and calculateBill is abstract in that class that doesn't forbid you from calling the method. The only restriction which is applied to abstract classes is that you can't instantiate them, once you have an instance (even if its runtime type is narrower) then you shouldn't worry about anything.

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Being the calculateBill is abstract and implemented in each subclass of order I should just be able to call it correct?

Java Runtime doesn't really care that there's no implementation of the calculateBill() method in Order, just that Order "knows about" (or maybe better yet, "has declared") a method called calculateBill() which accepts no arguments and returns a double -- which it does because of your line:

public abstract double calculateBill();

Ensuring that concrete subclasses actually implement the abstract method is a check done at compile time. As long as you've overridden the calculateBill() methods in the subclasses (which you would need to do for the code to compile), you'll be able to call it (from anywhere, since you declared it as public). The specific implementation calculateBill() -- that is whether it's class Foo's implementation or class Bar's -- will be selected for you at runtime, based on the specific subclass instance you're calling it on.

Also if that is the case then shouldn't OrderManager extend Order?

No. I don't see why it should. It doesn't seem to make a ton of sense. If you did, you'd have to have a concrete implementation of calculateBill() inside OrderManager which similarly doesn't seem to make a ton of sense.

Or just being in the same package would allow me to call it's methods?

Public (nonstatic) methods (which calculateBill() is) are callable by anyone who has an instance of the class, whether the calling class is within the same package or not.

Or am I going about it all wrong?

You seem to be on the right track with abstract methods and implementations in the subclasses, as well as providing default implementations of various methods in the abstract class (e.g. getPrice(), getLocation())

share|improve this answer

getOrdersAbove should create a new ArrayList to hold the orders above val.

You are adding the selected orders back to the list you are iterating over which will cause the iterator to fail.

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