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I have an engine that builds a query. So this is not static and this is why I had to go this way (below). Plus, it works for SQL and Oracle (Oracle adds different wrapper, RowNum, etc...). I have no easy way to test Oracle but below is SQL Server problem, step-by-step logic

Lets take a simple query

Select field1 as f1, myDate dateFld From table1 t1 Where t1.field2 = 1

I may or may not, have to union output with another table

Select field1, myDate dateFld as f1 From table1 t1 Where t1.field2 = 1
Union
Select field2, myDate dateFld as f1 From table2 t2 Where t2.field2 = 2

I need to get only N records from this Union

Select Top(N) * 
From
   ( 
    Select field1 as f1, myDate dateFld From table1 t1 Where t1.field2 = 1
    Union
    Select field2 as f1, myDate dateFld From table2 t2 Where t2.field2 = 2
   ) Union_Tbl_Alias
Order By dateFld Desc, f1 

Remember this "Order by"

I also have Select Subqueries (and nothing I can do but have them in Select), which I moved to yet another Select wrapper

Select 
    f1, 
    myDate,
    (Select field99 From table99 t99 Where t99.f1 = Outer_Tbl_Alias.f1) as f3
From
    (
        Select Top(N) * 
        From
           ( 
            Select field1 as f1, myDate dateFld From table1 t1 Where t1.field2 = 1
            Union
            Select field2 as f1, myDate dateFld From table2 t2 Where t2.field2 = 2
           )
        Order By dateFld Desc, f1
    ) Outer_Tbl_Alias

So the problem is that outer-most select reshuffles records a bit. They no longer sorted dateFld Desc. I don't want to speculate, I think, this is only SQL Server issue but I will test it in oracle as well. Moving "Order By" to outer-most statement fixes it for SQL Server.

But I'm wondering:

1 - why it happens?

2 - is there a hint to tell SQL server - keep the order of inner Select?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

That behavior appears to make sense. Your outer query does not contain an ORDER BY clause so the order of the results is arbitrary. The fact that rows may have been ordered in a subquery is not controlling (though it undoubtedly does end up affecting the order of the results). Since you are building the query programmatically, it would make far more sense to add whatever ORDER BY clause you want than to try to work around the issue (and I'm not aware of a way to work around the issue that is guaranteed to work every time).

You'll have exactly the same issue when you run against an Oracle database and switch out the TOP for a couple of nested queries with rownum predicates. The only way to guarantee the order of your results is to add an ORDER BY clause. Since that is going to be necessary regardless of the database you are using, it makes even more sense to do it correctly by adding the additional ORDER BY to the outer query rather than having different database-specific workarounds.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Or (in the specific case) the OP can remove the Outer_Tbl_Alias wrapping. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Sep 19 '13 at 0:13
    
Oracle uses Order of inner select as order of records. Work every time. Problem seem only for SQL Server. This is really not an issue, only a behavior. – T.S. Sep 24 '13 at 0:50
    
@T.S. - You may not have observed it in Oracle. That does not mean that Oracle will always return data in the order specified in an inner query. I can guarantee you, in fact, that there are cases where the order will change. – Justin Cave Sep 24 '13 at 3:19
    
Just a thought... In Oracle there is RowId, which is used to sort records unless there is specific sort. May be this has something to do with the way oracle works. – T.S. Sep 24 '13 at 13:15
    
@T.S. - A ROWID is a physical address of a row. There is no such thing as a "default sort" in Oracle. It is entirely possible that you will receive rows out of ROWID order. If you are dealing with toy tables in toy databases and you happen to be doing full table scans without using parallel query, sure, it's reasonably likely that rows will happen to be returned in ROWID order. That should not lead you to believe that in busy databases with many large and growing tables where parallel query may be used among dozens of different variables that you can count on a "default sort order" – Justin Cave Sep 25 '13 at 8:42

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