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I have an assignment that is asking me to fill up a stack with random variables and pop them out in a FILO order. Whilst I managed to get it to work using just the int type, it seems that now i need to change it in order to implement an array of doubles and it would fill the array with characters using the type double and Keep popping out doubles from the stack until it is empty and print them. I have tried just changing the types in both functions but keep getting errors andI'm not sure why. This is what i have so far by the way.Any help would be appreciated.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

#define STACK_SIZE  10

#define STACK_FULL   -2
#define STACK_EMPTY -1
#define NORMAL          0

int myerror = NORMAL;

void push(double [],
          double,   // input - data being pushed onto the stack
          double **,    // input/output - pointer to pointer to the top of stack
          int);     // constant - maximum capacity of stack

double          // output - data being popped out from the stack
pop(double [],  // input/output - the stack
    double **); // input/output - pointer to pointer to top of stack

void push(double stack[],
          double item,
          double **top,
          int max_size)
{
    stack[++(**top)] = item;
}

double pop(double stack[],
           double **top)
{
    return stack[(**top)--];
    return 0.0;
}

int main()
{
    double s[STACK_SIZE];
    double *s_top = NULL;

    srand(time(NULL));
    char randChar = ' ';
    double i = 0;
    double j=0;
    double randNum = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < STACK_SIZE; i++){
        randNum = 33 + (double)(rand() % ((126-33)+ 1 ));
        randChar = (double) randNum;
        push(s,randChar, &(*s_top), STACK_SIZE);

        printf ("Random characters: %c\n", randChar);}

    printf("-----------\n");

    for(j=STACK_SIZE; j>0; j--){
        printf("Random characters: %c\n", pop(s, & *s_top));
    }

    return 0;
}

These are the errors btw

stack.c: In function ‘push’: stack.c:28: error: array subscript is not an integer stack.c: In function ‘pop’: stack.c:35: error: array subscript is not an integer stack.c: In function ‘main’: stack.c:42: warning: initialization makes pointer from integer without a cast stack.c:53: warning: passing argument 3 of ‘push’ from incompatible pointer type stack.c:60: warning: passing argument 2 of ‘pop’ from incompatible pointer type stack.c:60: warning: format ‘%c’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘double’ stack.c:60: warning: format ‘%c’ expects type ‘int’, but argument 2 has type ‘double’

Basically this is what i had before using the type integer and it was working and now he gave instructions and wants us to change it to type double and i was trying to merge them to no avail.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#define STACK_SIZE 10
#define STACK_EMPTY -1

void push(char [], // input/ouput - the stack
          char,    // input - data being pushed onto the stack
          int *,   // input/output - pointer to the index of the top of stack
          int);    // constant - maximum size of stack

char           // output - data being popped out from the stack
pop(char [],  // input/output - the stack
    int *);   // input/output - pointer to the index of the top of stack

void push(char stack[],
          char item,
          int *top,
          int max_size){

    stack[++(*top)] = item;

}

char pop(char stack[],
         int *top){


    return stack[(*top)--];

    // Return STACK_EMPTY if the stack is empty.

    return STACK_EMPTY;
}

int main(){
    char s[STACK_SIZE];
    int s_top = STACK_EMPTY; // Pointer points to the index of the top of the stack

    srand(time(NULL));

    char randChar = ' ';
    int i = 0;
    int j=0;
    int randNum = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < STACK_SIZE; i++){
        randNum = 33 + (int)(rand() % ((126-33)+ 1 ));
        randChar = (char) randNum;
        push(s,randChar, &s_top, STACK_SIZE);

        printf ("Random characters: %c\n", randChar);}

    printf("-----------\n");

    for(j=STACK_SIZE; j>0; j--){
        printf("Random characters: %c\n", pop(s, &s_top));
    }


    return 0;
}

ok so this is what he asked us to do , ill edit instead of making a long comment to everyone, i think that would be easier

"You implemented the push and pop operations on a stack before and Here, you are asked to do it again, but with 4 major changes as described below:

  • The stack is going to be in the form of an array of doubles.
  • The third argument to push() and the second argument to pop() are going to be in the form of double **top,i.e. a pointer to pointer which stores the address of the current top element on the stack.

  • A global integer variable myerror is created for you. Its value could be STACK_FULL, STACK_EMPTY, and NORMAL. Use this variable in your push() and pop() functions to inform the main() function the status of the operations. "

share|improve this question
    
Have you read the errors? Could you post them? It looks like you converted top to a double, but it is an index so it should remain an integer. Although, if it is an index and not a stack pointer, I don't understand why it is a double pointer (as in two *s instead of just one). –  paddy Sep 18 '13 at 22:53
    
The stack top should not be a double, it should be regular integer type. Nor should it be a pointer-to-pointer. And the pop-functionality shouldn't even need the stack array passed. It should return error status if encountered and simply decrement the stack top if none occurred. a top function should pull the stack top-value (but I'm sure your instructor has other ideas). –  WhozCraig Sep 18 '13 at 22:54
    
++(**top)?? I can see what you were trying to do, but I don't see why it's a double pointer or a double... –  Dave Sep 18 '13 at 22:55
    
part of the instructions the teacher gave us said we should use a pointer to a pointer and i got a little confused as to what he means –  walkirie27 Sep 18 '13 at 22:57
    
@user233942 for a static stack you don't need a double-pointer, so your instructor's assignment is a pretty poor application of using one. All you need is the base pointer (the stack array) and a top-index (an integral) and some pointer-math. I know how you could use one, but its pretty pointless to do so. –  WhozCraig Sep 18 '13 at 23:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm fairly confident this is something along the lines of what was intended for this assignment. Note the use of a by-address pointer parameter (i.e. a pointer-to-pointer) for remembering where the stack top is. Double pointers are a little daunting the first time you really use them, and honestly this is a really poor example of how one should be used.

Note that with a ptr-to-ptr the only real use for the array base is to test the limits of how many elements you already have. As I said, a little pointless.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>

#define STACK_SIZE  10

#define STACK_FULL   -2
#define STACK_EMPTY -1
#define NORMAL          0

int push(double stack[], double value, double **top, int sizemax)
{
    if (*top - stack < sizemax)
    {
        **top = value;
        ++*top;
        return NORMAL;
    }
    return STACK_FULL;
}

int pop(double stack[], double **top, double *result)
{
    if (*top - stack > 0)
    {
        --*top;
        *result = **top;
        return NORMAL;
    }
    return STACK_EMPTY;
}


int main()
{
    double s[STACK_SIZE];
    double *s_top = s;
    double randNum = 0;
    double i = 0;

    srand((unsigned)time(NULL));

    for (i = 0; i < STACK_SIZE; i++)
    {
        randNum = 33 + (double)(rand() % ((126-33)+ 1 ));
        printf("Random value: %f\n", randNum);
        push(s, randNum, &s_top, STACK_SIZE);
    }

    printf("-----------\n");

    while (pop(s, &s_top, &randNum) != STACK_EMPTY)
        printf("Random value: %f\n", randNum);

    return 0;
}

Doing it like this is heavily prone to errors, since you can pass any value you like for the stack top, even something that was never initialized with the base-address of s[]. It would be much better to use an int offset (by address, of course) than a double pointer. Thus one of the reasons I said it was a poor fit for this assignment.


Regarding your posted code. I could tear it up, but its obvious you're not comfortable with pointer arithmetic or ptr-to-ptr situations (especially in assignments where they're a poor fit, I imagine). Some things bear noting, however.

  1. Anytime you see yourself doing this: &(*(var)) you know something isn't right. It is both incorrect and won't compile. Interesting to note that the opposite order is not undefined, but is rather pointless: *(&(var)) is equivalent to var.

  2. All these functions should either return state or values. Note the change I made to pop. Also, normally one has functions like empty() and top() for stacks, queues, lists, etc. A proper return value is what allows me to write the final while-loop the way it is defined in the above code.

  3. Pay attention to your printf() specifiers. You never changed yours when you text-replaced all "char" with "double" (which wasn't going to work anyway) and were therefore sending a double to printf() where it expected an integer type. It won't crash, but it certainly also won't be correct output. (and it would likely crash had you made the opposite mistake, sending a char to a %f specifier).

  4. Don't global-replace data types and expect your code to just compile. Rarely is it that simple (as you found out).

  5. Judging by the code posted here, take a look at your char implementation for similar problems.

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
yea i believe thats what he wants, also how would i go about running the above pushing and popping until the user specifies that he wants it to end? –  walkirie27 Sep 18 '13 at 23:38
    
@user233942 unrelated question. Thats a user-input loop. Spend some time in your text book. They'll have samples of it, I'm sure. –  WhozCraig Sep 18 '13 at 23:39
    
ok thank you for your help and pointers, very clear and helpful. –  walkirie27 Sep 18 '13 at 23:50
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#define STACK_SIZE 10

typedef struct
{
    double items[STACK_SIZE];
    double* next;
} Stack;

void init(Stack* s)
{
    s->next = s->items;
}

void push(Stack* s, double val)
{
    if (s->next >= s->items + STACK_SIZE)
       fprintf(stderr, "stack overflow\n");
    else
    {
        *s->next++ = val;
        printf("push %g\n", val);
    }
}

void pop(Stack* s)
{
    if (s->next == s->items)
       fprintf(stderr, "stack underflow\n");
    else
        printf("pop %g\n", *--s->next);
}

int main(void)
{
    Stack s;
    init(&s);

    srand(time(NULL));

    for (int i = 0; i < STACK_SIZE; i++)
        push(&s, (double)rand());

    printf("-----------\n");

    for (int i = 0; i < STACK_SIZE; i++)
        pop(&s);

    return 0;
}     
share|improve this answer

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