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I would like to declare an enum Direction, that has a method that returns the opposite direction (the following is not syntactically correct, i.e, enums cannot be instantiated, but it illustrates my point). Is this possible in Java?

Here is the code:

public enum Direction {

     NORTH(1),
     SOUTH(-1),
     EAST(-2),
     WEST(2);

     Direction(int code){
          this.code=code;
     }
     protected int code;
     public int getCode() {
           return this.code;
     }
     static Direction getOppositeDirection(Direction d){
           return new Direction(d.getCode() * -1);
     }
}
share|improve this question
    
Just use a switch. You only have 4 cases. – Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 18 '13 at 22:56
6  
By the way, d.getCode() * -1 == -d.getCode() – Doorknob Sep 18 '13 at 22:59
    
Chapter 6 (in 2E, at least) of Bloch's Effective Java might be of interest, and highly recommended. – jedwards Sep 18 '13 at 23:05
up vote 91 down vote accepted

How about something like

public enum Direction {

    NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST;

    private Direction opposite;

    static {
        NORTH.opposite = SOUTH;
        SOUTH.opposite = NORTH;
        EAST.opposite = WEST;
        WEST.opposite = EAST;
    }

    public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
        return opposite;
    }

}

Here is little more "hacky" way to illustrate @jedwards comment but it is not as flexible as first approach

public enum Direction {
    NORTH, EAST, SOUTH, WEST;

    private static final Direction[] values = values();// to avoid recreating array

    public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
        return values[(ordinal() + 2) % 4];
    }
}
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2  
Nice solution :) – Melih Altıntaş Sep 18 '13 at 23:03
1  
I was about to whip up an .values()[ordinal()] hack but this approach is much more robust – jedwards Sep 18 '13 at 23:04
    
how do you use it, though? and what is this technique called? – Thufir Jul 7 '14 at 6:46
1  
@Thufir "how do you use it" if you are asking about method, then like any other method - you invoke it on instance of class with this method. Instances of Direction enum class are NORTH, EAST, SOUTH, WEST so you can just use NORTH.getOppositeDirection() and it will return SOUTH. "what is this technique called?" if you are asking about static{...} then it is static initialization block, it is code invoked when class is loaded first time (it is part of same process which initialize static fields). – Pshemo Jul 7 '14 at 13:47

For a small enum like this, I find the most readable solution to be:

public enum Direction {

    NORTH {
        @Override
        public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
            return SOUTH;
        }
    }, 
    SOUTH {
        @Override
        public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
            return NORTH;
        }
    },
    EAST {
        @Override
        public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
            return WEST;
        }
    },
    WEST {
        @Override
        public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
            return EAST;
        }
    };


    public abstract Direction getOppositeDirection();

}
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3  
Great idea! This is also good when you generally want each enum value to have a specific behavior. – OferBr Jun 9 '14 at 11:09

This works:

public enum Direction {
    NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST;

    public Direction oppose() {
        switch(this) {
            case NORTH: return SOUTH;
            case SOUTH: return NORTH;
            case EAST:  return WEST;
            case WEST:  return EAST;
        }
        return null;
    }
}
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3  
Rather than returning null a default clause that throws a suitable RuntimeException might be better to indicate that there was a programmer error in not defining an opposite for a newly added direction. – Timothy055 May 29 '15 at 20:23
    
This requires the caller to handle null. It also requires the maintainer to make sure they add a case every time a new Direction type is added. See Amir Afghani's answer about using a abstract method that can be overridden by each enum value, that way you never risk missing one, and you don't have to worry about handling null. – P1X3L5 Jan 13 at 17:46

Create an abstract method, and have each of your enumeration values override it. Since you know the opposite while you're creating it, there's no need to dynamically generate or create it.

It doesn't read nicely though; perhaps a switch would be more manageable?

public enum Direction {
    NORTH(1) {
        @Override
        public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
            return Direction.SOUTH;
        }
    },
    SOUTH(-1) {
        @Override
        public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
            return Direction.NORTH;
        }
    },
    EAST(-2) {
        @Override
        public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
            return Direction.WEST;
        }
    },
    WEST(2) {
        @Override
        public Direction getOppositeDirection() {
            return Direction.EAST;
        }
    };

    Direction(int code){
        this.code=code;
    }
    protected int code;

    public int getCode() {
        return this.code;
    }

    public abstract Direction getOppositeDirection();
}
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Yes we do it all the time. You return a static instance rather than a new Object

 static Direction getOppositeDirection(Direction d){
       Direction result = null;
       if (d != null){
           int newCode = -d.getCode();
           for (Direction direction : Direction.values()){
               if (d.getCode() == newCode){
                   result = direction;
               }
           }
       }
       return result;
 }
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