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I learned just now that this is a way to test in a batch file if a file is a link:

dir %filename% |  find "<SYMLINK>" && (
   do stuff
)

How can I do a similar trick for testing if a directory is a symlink. It doesn't work to just replace with , because dir %directoryname% lists the contents of the directory, not the directory itself.

It seems like I need some way to ask dir to tell me about the directory in the way that it would if I asked in the parent directory. (Like ls -d does in unix).

Or any other way of testing if a directory is a symlink?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

general code:

fsutil reparsepoint query "folder name" | find "Symbolic Link" >nul && echo symbolic link found || echo No symbolic link

figure out, if the current folder is a symlink:

fsutil reparsepoint query "." | find "Symbolic Link" >nul && echo symbolic link found || echo No symbolic link

figure out, if the parent folder is a symlink:

fsutil reparsepoint query ".." | find "Symbolic Link" >nul && echo symbolic link found || echo No symbolic link
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Sweet, thanks - it was really helpful to have the general and some specific examples, and I just found out that there is fsutil ... some more learning to do! –  GreenAsJade Sep 19 '13 at 5:10
    
This will only work with English-language Windows. For some reason MS loves to localize command-line strings... The fix is just don't use find (no need to, the errorlevel is enough). –  Camilo Martin Aug 20 at 15:58
    
I always make my answers here for a specific question by a specific user. A batch file/cmd line is never the solution for all similar questions. Moreover, this is not a Windows specific issue, you can localise Linux as well. –  Endoro Aug 20 at 23:37

You have three methods

Solution 1: fsutil reparsepoint

Use symlink/junction with fsutil reparsepoint query and check %errorlevel% for success, like this:

set tmpfile=%TEMP%\%RANDOM%.tmp

fsutil reparsepoint query "%DIR%" >"%tmpfile%"
if %errorlevel% == 0 echo This is a symlink/junction
if %errorlevel% == 1 echo This is a directory

This works, because the fsutil reparsepoint query can't do anything on standard directory and throw an error. But, the permission error causes %errorlevel%=1 too!

Solution 2: dir + find

List links of parent directory with dir, filter output with find and check %errorlevel% for success, like this:

set tmpfile=%TEMP%\%RANDOM%.tmp

dir /AL /B "%PARENT_DIR%" | find "%NAME%" >"%tmpfile%"
if %errorlevel% == 0 echo This is a symlink/junction
if %errorlevel% == 1 echo This is a directory

Solution 3: for (the best)

Get attributes of directory with for and check the last from it, because this indicate links. I think, this is smarter and the best solution.

for %i in ("%DIR%") do set attribs=%~ai
if "%attribs:~-1%" == "l" echo This is a symlink/junction

FYI: This solution is not depend on %errorlevel%, so you can check "valid errors" too!

Sources

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fsutil reparsepoint query was great, thanks! –  Camilo Martin Aug 21 at 22:47

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