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if (month > 0 && month <= 12)
    if (day > 0 && day <= checkDays(month, year))
        if (year >= 1752 || year <= 9999)
            if((month != 12 && day != 31 && year != 9999))
                return true;
            else return false;
        else return false;
    else return false;
else return false;

I have the values month = 12, days = 31, and year = 2008 and the data validation is failing at the last part, but I cannot figure out why.

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closed as off-topic by Joel, nijansen, JB., Scott W, sashkello Sep 19 '13 at 9:47

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – nijansen, sashkello
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Define "failing". –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 18 '13 at 23:26
1  
WHat does checkDays do? Can we see it's code? –  andy256 Sep 18 '13 at 23:26
5  
if((month != 12 && day != 31 - There's a double false. –  chris Sep 18 '13 at 23:26
    
Hate those && ... ! expressions! –  andy256 Sep 18 '13 at 23:28
    
What do you mean by a double false? –  user2311799 Sep 18 '13 at 23:28

3 Answers 3

Your first year condition uses OR when you wanted AND; your second year condition is exactly inverted from what I suspect you wanted.

You also have an order-of-operations bug: you can't check the day until after you validate the month and the year (assuming what checkDays does is provide the maximum day number for a particular (month, year) pair; if so, you should rename it days_in_month).

Finally, code like this is generally much easier to read if written as a series of if-fail-return-false conditions without any nesting. Like so:

// Year range supported is [1752, 9999].
// (Gregorian calendar introduced in 1752 in Great Britain.)
if (year < 1752 || year > 9999)
  return false;

// Valid month numbers in [1, 12].
if (month < 1 || month > 12)
  return false;

// Valid day numbers in [1, n] where n depends on month and year.
if (day < 1 || day > checkDays(month, year))
  return false;

// 9999-12-31 is invalid (used as a sentinel value?)
if (year == 9999 && month == 12 && day == 31)
  return false;

return true;

By the way, the Long Now people would like a word regarding your upper year limit.

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I find it's nearly always easier to write these things with the "find the false things and return". So:

if (month < 1 || month > 12) return false;
if (day < 1 || day > 31) return false;
if (year < 1752 || year > 9999) return false; 
if (month == 12 && day == 31 && year == 9999) return false;

// If we get here, everything is fine, so return true.
return true; 

Of course, you should probably check the day based on which month it is:

int daysInMonth[12] = { 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 };
if (month < 1 || month > 12) return false;  // Must do this before checking day!
int daysThisMonth = daysInMonth[month]; 
// Check for leapyear.
if (month == 2 && year % 4 == 0 && (year % 100 != 0 || year % 400 == 0))
{
   daysThisMonth = 29;
}
if (month != 2 && day < 1 || day > daysThisMonth) return false;
...
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"you should probably check the day based on which month it is" - that's probably what checkDays was for in the original code. –  Dukeling Sep 18 '13 at 23:50
    
@Dukeling: True... –  Mats Petersson Sep 19 '13 at 0:00

A bit of speculation, since I don't quite know what your function is supposed to do, but here goes.

month != 12 && day != 31 && year != 9999 only returns true if the month is not 12 and the day is not 31 and the year is not 9999.

So for your input, it's:

month != 12 && day != 31 && year != 9999
=> false && false && true
=> false

Don't you maybe want:

month != 12 || day != 31 || year != 9999

Which will return true if either the month is not 12 or the day is not 31 or the year is not 9999.

An equivalent, but possibly more understandable way of writing it:

!(month == 12 && day == 31 && year == 9999)

So that's "if the month is 12 and the day 31 and the year 9999, return false".

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I need it so that it doesn't allow the date 12/31/9999 to come in. –  user2311799 Sep 18 '13 at 23:33
    
@user2311799 That's what month != 12 || day != 31 || year != 9999 will do. –  Dukeling Sep 18 '13 at 23:34

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