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I'm trying to catch an exception, add information to it, and throw a new (enhanced) exception for the calling module.

Example:

    void CallingMethod()
    {
        try
        {
            doStuff();
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
        }
    }

    void doStuff()
    {
        try
        {
            // do something here that may throw an error
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            Exception e2 = new Exception("new added info", e);
            throw e2;
        }
        finally()
        {
            // cleanup
        }
    }

but when the error occurs and is written to the console, it is the original error not my new error containing the string "new added info".

Is this expected? How should I throw a new error to be caught?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Kirk Woll, Scott Chamberlain, Ilya Ivanov, dreamlax, C-Pound Guru Sep 19 '13 at 0:27

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Unable to reproduce this.. seems to be the new exception with the original one as the inner exception.. – Simon Whitehead Sep 18 '13 at 23:43
1  
I copy-pasted your code, and "new info added" is the first thing output to the console. – McGarnagle Sep 18 '13 at 23:44
    
What is original exception? – Alessandro D'Andria Sep 18 '13 at 23:47
    
I've just found the problem - the "cleanup" in finally() was throwing another exception. Once I rectify this I get the expected behaviour - my new e2 feeds through. – mcmillab Sep 18 '13 at 23:50
4  
This question appears to be off-topic because it has already been answered by the OP. – Kirk Woll Sep 18 '13 at 23:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Consider this program:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace ConsoleApplication20
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
      DoSomething() ;
      return ;
    }
    static void DoSomething()
    {
      try
      {
        DoSomethingThatFails() ;
      }
      catch( Exception e )
      {
        throw new InvalidOperationException( "This is the wrapper exception" , e ) ;
      }
    }
    static int DoSomethingThatFails()
    {
      int x = 3 ;
      int y = 0 ;
      int z = x / y ; // can you say "divide by zero"?
      return z ;
    }
  }
}

This is what gets written to the console:

Unhandled Exception: System.InvalidOperationException: This is the wrapper exception ---> System.DivideByZeroException: Attempted to divide by zero.
   at ConsoleApplication20.Program.DoSomethingThatFails() in ...\Program.cs:line 32
   at ConsoleApplication20.Program.DoSomething() in ...\Program.cs:line 21
   --- End of inner exception stack trace ---
   at ConsoleApplication20.Program.DoSomething() in ...\Program.cs:line 25
   at ConsoleApplication20.Program.Main(String[] args) in ...\Program.cs:line 14

You'll notice the first line consists of the outer exception and its message (InvalidOperationException and This is the wrapper exception), followed by an arrow (--->), followed by the inner exception (DivideByZeroException and Attempted to divide by zero.).

The next two lines are the stack trace of the inner exception, followed by a marker to indicate the end of the inner exception's stack trace. Then you get the stack trace for the outer exception.

All the information is there, you're just not seeing it.

share|improve this answer
    
my situation was actually not as you expected here (see my comment on the question - I had another error being thrown in finally()), but this answer could have been the cause, so I have accepted it, thanks – mcmillab Sep 19 '13 at 0:51

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