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I'm still trying to understand recursion and what I expected the code to print and what actually printed is different.

so here's the code which is just based off a simple example I found on youtube,

def count(n):
    if n > 0:
        print "Count 1", ", ", n

        count(n - 1)

        print "Count 2", ", ", n
    else:
        print "Done"

count(1)

and this is what it prints,

Count 1 , 1

Done

Count 2 , 1

What I expected was

Count 1 , 1

Done

Done

My understanding (which of course is wrong) is that count(1) (for the outer count function) will be called and because 1 is greater than 0 will print 1, then count(1 - 1) (inner count function) will call count(0) (outer count function) and since 0 is not greater than 1 this will print Done. Then I thought the return from count(1 - 1) (inner count function) would also return Done and since there were no other n values entered into the inner count() that would be it. I'm not understanding how done prints once and 1 prints twice???

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1  
The recursive call does not modify the values of local variables in the current call. So your understanding is wrong (also because the function doesn't return anything, so your talk about "return Done" doesn't make a lot of sense). –  vanza Sep 19 '13 at 1:07
    
you can use the built in debugger and walk through your code line by line import pdb; pdb.set_trace(); –  dm03514 Sep 19 '13 at 1:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let's go through the function by hand for an input of 1:

  • count(1) called (n is 1):
    • n > 0 is true, so (if clause):
      • print Count 1 , 1 (since n is 1 here)
      • count(0) called (n is 0):
        • n > 0 is false, so (else clause):
          • print Done
      • print Count 2 , 1 (since n is 1 here)

As you can see, done is only printed once. When you're faced with this type of dilemma it's often very helpful to get out the ol' pencil and notepad and trace out exactly what's happening by hand.

You can also think about a simplified version of your function by removing those first two print statements, since they shouldn't effect how many times "Done" is printed:

def count(n):
    if n > 0:
        count(n - 1)
    else:
        print "Done"

Now it should be much clearer that "Done" will only be printed once:

  • count(1) called (n is 1):
    • n > 0 is true, so (if clause):
      • count(0) called (n is 0):
        • n > 0 is false, so (else clause):
          • print Done
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Ok, thank you this makes complete sense. There was a lesson on youtube and the teacher was talking about an "implicit return" which confused me and made me think of count(n - 1) returning something? –  jc72 Sep 19 '13 at 16:18

Let's do a simple expansion of the count function to see what's really going on:

def count0:
    print "Done"

def count1:
    print "Count 1, 1"
    count0()
    print "Count 2, 1"

As you can see, count1 (and really any count(n) for n > 0) will never print "Done". So it is only ever printed once.

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Your script has two statements

  1. The definition of count
  2. A call of count with argument 1.

So count is called and n is 1. Since n is bigger than 0, you execute these three lines in order

    print "Count 1", ", ", n    # ===> which prints Count 1, 1

    count(n - 1)                # ===> which prints Done

    print "Count 2", ", ", n    # ===> which prints Count 2, 1

As with all recursive functions, don't try to overthink things and trace into the inner calls. Look at the script from the top-level only and let the recursion do its magic. Your call executed three lines. Sure the inner line was a recursive call but don't worry about it until you've figured out what the other lines do.

And oh by the way, each recursive call gets its own copy on n, so the "outer value" is not affected. Sure you can write recursive code which has side-effects, but you really don't want to do that.

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When the call count(n-1) returns, it continues to run the following lines, in that case, the other print with Count 2.

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Because the print "Done" in the else block only occurs in calls to count when n <= 0. In your first call with n = 1, this statement will not be executed, it only gets executed on the second, recursive call, when n is 0.

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I think where you are going wrong is that nothing happens with the return value of count(n-1).

The first call to count with n=1 prints "Count 1,1" then count(0) is called. In this call n=0 so it prints "Done" and returns. Now we are back in the count(1), just after the call to count(0). Then we just do the next statement which prints "Count 2, 1" because n is still 1 here. Then we're done.

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Ahhhhhh yes this is what I was also wondering about, thank you!!!! I couldn't figure out which count() the code ended with, what would print and why? This really helped me understand thanks. –  jc72 Sep 19 '13 at 16:22

after it prints out the first line Count 1, 1

it calls the the method which will print Done because the n is now 0 so fails the if condition.

then it will come back to method which called the method and go to the next line

which is print Count 2, 1 because n hasn't changed its value (if you set n = n-1, n will equal 0).

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