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I am trying to build a schema to store a website navigation map. Picture the typical dataset as a Sitemap where pages can have child pages, and those child pages can have more children. An example would be the following object:

$tree = array(
    'home' => array(
        'h1' => 'test',
        'h2' => 'test2',
        'copy' => 'copy here',
        'slug' => '',
        'children' => array(
            'blah' => array(
                'h1' => 'child1',
                'h2' => 'child1',
                'copy' => 'child copy here',
                'slug' => 'blah',
                'children' => array(
                    'blahsub' => array(
                        'h1' => 'subchild1',
                        'h2' => 'subchild2',
                        'copy' => 'child copy here',
                        'slug' => 'blahsub',
                        'children' => array(
                            'subsubchild1' => array(
                                'h1' => 'subsubchild1',
                                'h2' => 'subsubchild2',
                                'copy' => 'child copy here',
                                'slug' => 'subsubchild1'
                            )
                        )
                    ),
                    'subchild2' => array(
                        'h1' => 'subchild1',
                        'h2' => 'subchild2',
                        'copy' => 'child copy here',
                        'slug' => 'subchild2',
                        'children' => array(
                            'subsubchild2' => array(
                                'h1' => 'subsubchild1',
                                'h2' => 'subsubchild2',
                                'copy' => 'child copy here',
                                'slug' => 'subsubchild2'
                            )
                        )
                    ),
                    'subchild3' => array(
                        'h1' => 'subchild1',
                        'h2' => 'subchild2',
                        'copy' => 'child copy here',
                        'slug' => 'subchild3',
                        'children' => array(
                            'subsubchild3' => array(
                                'h1' => 'subsubchild1',
                                'h2' => 'subsubchild2',
                                'copy' => 'child copy here',
                                'slug' => 'subsubchild3'
                            )
                        )
                    )
                )
            ),
            'another' => array(
                'h1' => 'child2',
                'h2' => 'child2',
                'copy' => 'child copy here',
                'slug' => 'another'
            )
        )
    )
);

Each level of the $tree is indexed by it's URI, and each level can contain N children, all of which can have children themselves.

My original thought was that using this schema is intuitive, however I am unsure about querying for specific nodes of the tree. Am I approaching this schema wrong? (The goal was not to have to make multiple queries to "build" such a tree on each request, instead to pull it once and work with it in-memory.

Note: I still can make a query to pull the entire tree, and then access each node directly via the subscript operator. This should give me better performance than multiple queries into the tree. Currently using mysql for this, and its a real bottleneck.

Please share your opinions on this schema, and ask for clarification if something was unclear.

Thanks!

Note - Main Objective: I would like to find items in the tree by their "index" (also the "slug" parameter of each node). I really am at a lose of where to start - does such a querying functionality exist? Must it be done in a loop with multiple queries?

share|improve this question
    
If it is/was a bottleneck, you may want to consider caching previously fetched results. –  icktoofay Sep 19 '13 at 2:47
    
What do you want to do? Get just a part of a nested element? Showing what you have tried can help. –  Joqus Sep 19 '13 at 3:07
    
I would like to find items in the tree by their "index" (also the "slug" parameter of each node). I really am at a lose of where to start - does such a querying functionality exist? Must it be done in a loop with multiple queries? –  user2107642 Sep 19 '13 at 3:13

1 Answer 1

This schema is less than optimal for querying and updating. You cannot, for example, update subsubchild3 guaranteeing that you would not get a race condition or be updating a stale document.

As to querying, currently the only conceivable way is to use the aggregation framework I believe.

You should look at this page: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/tutorial/model-tree-structures/ on how to model tree structures within the MongoDB manual, more specifically "Materialized Paths". I have found success with that method when it comes to querying, however, it is harder to update, you just have to weigh your options and choose what is best for your queries.

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The reason I am hesitant to go with the Materialized Paths pattern is that a modification to a parent node's path will not "trickle down" the tree. For example, /programming & /programming/ruby. If one were to change "programming" to "programs", you would be stuck with /programs & /programming/ruby. From a "read" perspective, I love the tree as I proposed because its a single object to work with from the db, but do you have any insights on performing writes to a specific node? ALSO, can you elaborate on the race case you mentioned? Thanks! –  user2107642 Sep 20 '13 at 0:41
    
@user2107642 This is where materialised paths have a problem, you must update all child nodes, though I actually have got it working in two calls, one to update the parent and the next to update the children –  Sammaye Sep 20 '13 at 7:00
    
@user2107642 with the race case it would occur because positional operators and what not can only go 2 deep and match only the first found at the moment (nested $ mathcing is coming in 2.5 I think) which means that to update children effectively and that you would need to pull the document out, modify it and then save it back in, this could cause you to update a stale document –  Sammaye Sep 20 '13 at 11:24
    
@user2107642 eseentially your operations on this document stand a very high chance of not being atomic –  Sammaye Sep 20 '13 at 11:29

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