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I saw on the Internet that people using following construction to get Global object

(1,eval)('this')

or this

(0||eval)('this')

Could you explain how exactly does it work and the benefit over window, top, etc.?

UPD: testing direct vs. indirect eval calls: http://kangax.github.io/jstests/indirect-eval-testsuite/

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marked as duplicate by Michael Anderson, bfavaretto, Bergi, deceze, Ved Prakash Sep 19 '13 at 7:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What's wrong with window or top? –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 19 '13 at 4:25
    
For me - nothing is wrong, but I want to know what is the point of doing this. For me - it is a black magic without any profit. –  hazzik Sep 19 '13 at 4:27
4  
stackoverflow.com/questions/9107240/… –  TGH Sep 19 '13 at 4:28
3  
I had never heard of this construct prior to reading this question, but I guess you learn something new every day :-) –  TGH Sep 19 '13 at 4:47
1  
perfectionkills.com/global-eval-what-are-the-options should leave no open questions. –  Bergi Sep 19 '13 at 5:58

1 Answer 1

(1,eval)('this') is equivalent to eval('this')

(0||eval)('this') is equivalent to eval('this')

So (1, eval) or (0 || eval) is an expression which yields eval

Like in:

var x = 2;
console.log( (10000, x) );  // will print 2 because it yields the second variable
console.log( (x, 10000) );  // will print 10000 because it yields the second literal
console.log( (10000 || x) ); // will print 10000 because it comes first in an OR
                             // expression

The only catch here it that an object returned from an expression is always the object having the most global scope.

Check that code:

x = 1;

function Outer() {
    var x = 2;
    console.log((1, eval)('x')); //Will print 1
    console.log(eval('x')); //Will print 2
    function Inner() {
        var x = 3;
        console.log((1, eval)('x')); //Will print 1
        console.log(eval('x')); //Will print 3
    }
    Inner();
}

Outer();
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