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The first one is straightforward, just walk from both sides until finding a reversion.

/*C++ version, [first, last), last needs --first to fetch the last element*/
/*returns the middle of partitioning result*/
int* partition( int *first, int *last, int pivot ) {
    while (true) {
        while (*first < pivot) ++first;
        --last;//Don't edit this, it's true.
        while (pivot < *last) --last;
        if (!(first < last)) return first;
        swap(*first, *last);
        ++first;
    }
}

The second one (shown in "Introduction to algorithms") is:

int* partition( int a[], int n, int pivot ) {
    bound = 0;
    for ( i = 1; i != n; ++i )
        if ( a[i] < pivot )
            swap( &a[i], &a[++bound]);
    swap(a, a + bound);
    return a + bound;
}

The invariant of the second one is " All elements before bound is less than pivot " .

Q: And what is the advantages and disadvantages of the two versions?

I'll give one first, the second one require ++ operation on the iterator( pointer ), so it can be applied to some ForwardIterator like the iterator of a linked list. Other tips?

share|improve this question
    
Is the first one actually correct, isn't the --last on the third line in the wrong place? – Joni Sep 19 '13 at 8:03
    
@Joni No, this is a c++ version in which last is an iterator that is one pass the last element. – zoujyjs Sep 19 '13 at 8:04
    
In that case I would recommend giving the full implementation, including the function definition and declarations for first, last and pivot, and a specification of what the function is supposed to return (the first one has a return statement, the second doesn't) – Joni Sep 19 '13 at 8:07
    
The first is the common algorithm used for finding two elements that are on wrong (opposite) sides of the pivot slot, and swapping them. The second is designed to choose where the pivot slot will eventually be, adjusting it incrementally and moving all values less than the pivot value below it in the process. Of the two, the second is usually easier to understand by beginners and imho less prone to erroneous implementations. The second can trigger more swaps, but both have similar complexity. – WhozCraig Sep 19 '13 at 8:25
    
@Joni Fine, done. Sorry for my vague statement. – zoujyjs Sep 19 '13 at 8:29
up vote 3 down vote accepted

As far as the basic idea of the two algorithms go, both are correct. They will do the same number of comparisons but the second one will do more swaps than the first.

You can see this by stepping through the algorithms as they partition the array 1 9 2 8 3 7 4 6 5 using 5 as the pivot. When the first algorithm swaps two numbers it never touches either of then again. The second algorithm first swaps 9 and 2, then 9 and 3, and so on, taking multiple swaps to move 9 to its final position.

There are other differences too. If I haven't made any mistakes, this is how the first algorithm partitions the array:

1 9 2 8 3 7 4 6 5
f                 l
1 9 2 8 3 7 4 6 5  # swap 9,5
  f             l
1 5 2 8 3 7 4 6 9  # swap 8,4
      f     l
1 5 2 4 3 7 8 6 9  # return f = 5
        l f

This is how the second algorithm partitions the array:

1 9 2 8 3 7 4 6 5  # 1<5, swap 1,1
bi      
1 9 2 8 3 7 4 6 5  # 9>5, no swap
  bi
1 9 2 8 3 7 4 6 5  # 2<5, swap 9,2
  b i
1 2 9 8 3 7 4 6 5  # 8>5, no swap
    b i
1 2 9 8 3 7 4 6 5  # 3<5, swap 9,3
    b   i
1 2 3 8 9 7 4 6 5  # 7>5, no swap
      b   i
1 2 3 8 9 7 4 6 5  # 4<5, swap 8,4
      b     i
1 2 3 4 9 7 8 6 5  # 6>5, no swap
        b     i
1 2 3 4 9 7 8 6 5  # 5=5, exit loop, swap 9,5
        b       i
1 2 3 4 5 7 8 6 9  # return b = 4
        b       i

Notice how it makes 5 swaps, compared to just 2 of the other algorithm. It also moves the last item in the array to the middle array. In this case the last item happens to be the pivot so it's the pivot that's moved to the middle, but that's not the general case.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is pretty good. The second example there is reason behind the last swap. Normally a pivot index x is chosen at the start, then swap(a[x],a[len-1]) is done to "store" the pivot value in the last location. The test condition of the loop is normally if ( a[i] < a[len-1] ) because that is where the pivot "value" is kept. And a[bound] will always be where the pivot value needs to go after the loop is finished, moving it there with one final swap. The same algorithm can also be done top-to-bottom, keeping the pivot value in a[0] until the loop finishes and the final swap occurs. – WhozCraig Sep 19 '13 at 15:03
    
A sample of the second implemented as an iterator-based template can be seen here: See It Live. Nice writeup (+1) – WhozCraig Sep 19 '13 at 15:09
    
@WhozCraig As a convention, the template parameters should named ForwardIterator which indicates the lowest requirement of the iterator. It's non the less a nice one, but STL do a lot more optimazations including eliminating the tail recursion, limit the depth of recursion, using a heapsort or insertion sort at a certain threshold, which is called introsort (D. R. Musser, "Introspective Sorting and Selection Algorithms", Software Practice and Experience 27(8):983, 1997.). For more details, refer to sgi.com/tech/stl/sort.html – zoujyjs Sep 22 '13 at 3:58
    
@zoujyjs surely. Some of the implementations of std::sort are outright amazing. The one for my implementation, the LLVM implementation from MIT) is simply outstanding. The steps they've gone to for smaller partition sorting are the result of a lot of work, and do exactly as you describe. They even go the extra mile for inlined 2,3,4, and 5 element unrolls. Beyond that up to a configurable limit it is insertion-sort, including temporary partial sorts, etc. Its like reading a science journal on sorting algorithms. – WhozCraig Sep 22 '13 at 4:50
    
@WhozCraig Isn't it nicer if the second recursion is written as quicksort(++pvt, last), pvt+1 require the iterator be a RandomAccessIterator since it use a operator+. – zoujyjs Sep 22 '13 at 6:03

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