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Here is what I'd like to do:

function a() {
  // ...
}
function b() {
  //  Some magic, return a new object.
}
var c = b();

c instanceof b // -> true
c instanceof a // -> true
b instanceof a // -> true

Is it possible? I can make b be an instance of a easily by hooking a into its prototype chain but then I have to do new b(), which is what I'm trying to avoid. Is what I want possible?

Update: I feel that it might be possible with judicious use of b.__proto__ = a.prototype. I'm going to experiment more after work.

Update 2: Below is what seems to be the closest you can get, which is good enough for me. Thanks all for the interesting answers.

function a() {
  // ...
}
function b() {
  if (!(this instanceof arguments.callee)) {
    return new arguments.callee();
  }
}
b.__proto__ = a.prototype

var c = b();
c instanceof b // -> true
c instanceof a // -> false
b instanceof a // -> true

Update 3: I found exactly what I wanted in a blog post on 'power constructors', once I added the essential b.__proto__ = a.prototype line:

var object = (function() {
     function F() {}
     return function(o) {
         F.prototype = o;
         return new F();
     };
})();

function a(proto) {
  var p = object(proto || a.prototype);
  return p;
}

function b(proto) {
  var g = object(a(proto || b.prototype));
  return g;
}
b.prototype = object(a.prototype);
b.__proto__ = a.prototype;

var c = b();
c instanceof b // -> true
c instanceof a // -> true
b instanceof a // -> true
a() instanceof a // -> true
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14  
I am curious: why do you want to avoid new? –  Upperstage Dec 11 '09 at 16:02
    
I am creating a Javascript version of Scala's case classes: github.com/pr1001/caseclass.js –  pr1001 Dec 11 '09 at 16:47
1  
@pr1001: Not seeing why that requires you to work around the new keyword. And __proto__ is not going to help you cross-browser. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 12 '09 at 0:09
1  
This is all syntactical sugar, nothing more. However, I think it's an interesting challenge all the same. –  pr1001 Dec 12 '09 at 0:32
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10 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can use this pattern:

function SomeConstructor(){
   if (!(this instanceof arguments.callee)){
        return new arguments.callee();
   }
   //the constructor properties and methods here
}

after which you can do:

var myObj = SomeConstructor();
share|improve this answer
    
I just tried this and it looks very promising. Will develop it more later. –  pr1001 Dec 11 '09 at 17:55
4  
+1 this is the usual idiom for allowing constructors to work without new. –  bobince Dec 11 '09 at 20:19
3  
Comment #1: But...but...but...it still uses new. I'm not seeing the point here, it's just a factory method that also allows the user to use new if they want to. That just leads to some members of the team using new and others not; a maintenance nightmare. Support one or the other (e.g., by including debug code you remove for production that throws an exception if the author didn't -- or did -- use new to call the constructor), but not both. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 13 '09 at 14:09
2  
Comment #2: If you want to use this pattern, make sure you use a named function (as in your example) and use the function's name, not arguments.callee -- e.g.: if (!(this instanceof SomeConstructor)). Using arguments.callee will slow down your functions dramatically (2-10x, depending on the JavaScript engine), and will throw an exception in JavaScript's new "strict" mode. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 13 '09 at 14:11
1  
Sorry, T.J., if I wasn't clear but I was looking for code where the end user, not the library creator, avoided using new. –  pr1001 Dec 14 '09 at 8:13
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What's wrong with using the new keyword?

At any rate, it sounds like the best thing to do is read up on Javascript inheritance: http://javascript.crockford.com/inheritance.html

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Not sure whats wrong with the new Key word. YUI uses it extensively... –  Zoidberg Dec 11 '09 at 20:12
2  
By all means, read Crockford. He's informed and educational. But don't read Crockford as gospel, not least because some of his earlier articles (at least!) promote extremely inefficient programming practices. And I'm not immediately seeing how Crockford's articles on simulating classical inheritance in JavaScript (now regarded by him as a "mistake") relate to the pragmatic question posted by the OP. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 12 '09 at 0:28
    
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Someone posted an article by douglas crockford in this question, and it explains exactly what your asking.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1809914/oo-javascript-constructor-pattern-neo-classical-vs-prototypal

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What an .... interesting approach. And darned if it doesn't do exactly that, get rid of new (and this). A bit extreme, but shows how powerful the language is. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 11 '09 at 16:18
1  
instanceof wouldn't return the results desired in the question though. –  AnthonyWJones Dec 11 '09 at 16:24
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The simple answer to your specific question is: no.

It would help you identified why you want to avoid new. Perhaps the patterns alluded to by one of the other answers will help. However none of them result in the instanceof returning true in your tests.

The new operation is essentially:-

var x = (function(fn) { var r = {}; fn.call(r); return r;}(b);

However there is the difference that the constructing fn is attached to the object using some internal property (yes you can get it with constructor but setting it doesn't have the same effect). The only way to get instanceof to work as intended is to use the new keyword.

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You can't avoid new in the general case (without going to extremes, as per the Crockford article Zoidberg indirectly linked to) if you want inheritance and instanceof to work, but then (again), why would you want or need to?

The only reason I can think of where you'd want to avoid it is if you're trying to pass a constructor function to another piece of code that doesn't know it's a constructor. In that case, just wrap it up in a factory function:

function b() {
    // ...
}
function makeB() {
    return new b();
}
var c = makeB();
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You can create instances without the new operator (here is a great article written about this by Douglas Crockford http://yuiblog.com/blog/2006/11/13/javascript-we-hardly-new-ya/). But it will not help you with the "instanceof" story.

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2  
That's not about general purpose new use, it's about specific places you can avoid it, such as with Object (use {} instead), Array (use [] instead), and especially Function. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 11 '09 at 16:06
    
The question was, if it's possible. The article explains that YES it is possible, and it also covers some aspects why it can be useful. –  nemisj Dec 11 '09 at 16:10
1  
@nemisj: No, it doesn't. It talks about not using new inappropriately (like new function() { ... }), not about avoiding using it in general. The article doesn't talk about inheritance at all, in fact. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 11 '09 at 16:14
    
@T.J. Crowder: My mistake, haven't noticed the idea behind c instance a :) –  nemisj Dec 11 '09 at 16:51
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Yes you can do this.

var User = function() {
  var privateMethod = function() {
    alert('hello');
  }

  return {
    sayHello : function() {
      privateMethod();
      this.done = true;
    }
  }
}

var user1 = User();

Is anything wrong with this method?

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The only way to get instanceof to work is to use the new keyword. instanceof exploits __proto__ which is established by new.

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Could I do something with assignment to proto then? –  pr1001 Dec 11 '09 at 17:37
    
Unfortunately, I understand proto is readonly. –  Upperstage Dec 11 '09 at 17:38
    
Of course, proto is "underscore underscore proto underscore underscore." –  Upperstage Dec 11 '09 at 17:39
    
Yep, stupid formatting. In Rhino and the Chrome debugger, __proto__ doesn't seem to be read-only. –  pr1001 Dec 11 '09 at 18:14
    
That's good to know; I read somewhere that _proto_ is deprecated. Might be a difficult tact to pursue given the different appraoches taken by different browsers. –  Upperstage Dec 11 '09 at 18:34
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JavaScript objects can be created without using the new keyword.

For example the following function returns an object without using new keyword


function a(){
    var obj ={};
    obj.name = "hello";
    obj.age = 12;

    return obj;

}
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1  
Right, but as AWJ said multiple times already, instanceof won't work as the OP wants it to by doing that. –  Matt Ball Dec 11 '09 at 16:58
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In a javascript bookmarklet, you could use eval(unescape("...")) to create object without "new" operator:

javascript:xhr=eval(unescape('new\x20XMLHttpRequest();'));alert(xhr);
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